Old Ballads: Historical and Narrative, with Some of Modern Date, Volume 3

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R. H. Evans, 1810 - Ballads, English
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Page 269 - GATHER ye rosebuds while ye may, Old Time is still a-flying: And this same flower that smiles to-day, To-morrow will be dying. The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun, The higher he's a-getting; The sooner will his race be run, And nearer he's to setting. That age is best, which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; But being spent, the worse, and worst Times still succeed the former. Then be not coy, but use your time, And while ye may, go marry: For having lost but once your prime, You may...
Page 246 - Tis since two hundred year — No malice then we knew, But all things plenty were : All friendship now decays, (Believe me, this is true,) Which was not in those days, When this old cap was new.
Page 342 - IN going to my naked bed, as one that would have slept, I heard a wife sing to her child, that long before had wept. She sighed sore, and sang full sweet to bring the babe to rest, That would not cease, but cried still, in sucking at her breast. .She was full weary of her watch, and grieved with her child; She rocked it, and rated it, till that on her it smiled. Then did she say, "Now have I found this proverb true to prove, The falling out of faithful friends, renewing is of love.
Page 343 - The falling out of faithful friends, renewing is of love. She said that neither king, ne prince, ne lord could live aright, Until their puissance they did prove, their manhood and their might ; When manhood shall be matched so that fear can take no place, Then weary works make warriors each other to embrace, And...
Page 264 - Over the mountains And over the waves, Under the fountains And under the graves ; Under floods that are deepest, Which Neptune obey ; Over rocks that are steepest Love will find out the way. Where there is no place For the glow-worm to lie ; Where there is no space For receipt of a fly ; Where the midge dares not venture Lest herself fast she lay ; If love come, he will enter And soon find out his way.
Page 85 - Defiled is my name full sore, Through cruel spite and false report, That I may say for evermore, Farewell my joy — adieu comfort : For wrongfully ye judge of me, Unto my fame a mortal wound ; Say what ye list, it will not be, Ye seek for that cannot be found.
Page 319 - I'll now direct my way, Where my two brothers bide, And raise the valiant of the Isles' To combat on my side. O, do not so ! the maid replies, With me till morning stay, For dark and dreary is the night, And dangerous is the way : All night I'll watch you in the park ; My faithful page I'll sendl To run and raise the Ross's clan, Their master to defend.
Page 79 - May-games, Perform'd in young and tender days, Can be no hindrance to their fames, Or stains of manhood any ways : But now it is ordain'd by law, We see on May-day's eve, at night, To keep unruly youths in awe. By London's watch, in armour...
Page 320 - His blood is on his sword : And far, far distant are his men, That should assist their lord.
Page 232 - Sir, I pray let me be ; Gif ever I have a man, Blew-cap for me." An Irishman, with a long skeane in his hose,* Did think to obtain her it was no great matter...

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