The Quarterly Review, Volume 74

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J. Murray, 1844
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Page 325 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present — advances us in the dignity of thinking beings.
Page 205 - Consider the ravens: for they neither sow nor reap ; which neither have storehouse nor barn; and God feedeth them : how much more are ye better than the fowls?
Page 128 - And they blessed Rebekah, and said unto her, Thou art our sister, be thou the mother of thousands of millions, and let thy seed possess the gate of those which hate them.
Page 168 - DRESSES AND DECORATIONS OF THE MIDDLE AGES, from the Seventh to the Seventeenth Centuries. 94 Plates, beautifully Coloured, a profusion of Initial Letters, and Examples of Curious Ornament, with Historical Introduction and Descriptive Text.
Page 452 - Some beauties yet no Precepts can declare, For there's a happiness as well as care. Music resembles Poetry, in each Are nameless graces which no methods teach, And which a master-hand alone can reach. If, where the rules not far enough extend, (Since rules were made but to promote their end) Some lucky Licence answer to the full Th' intent propos'd, that Licence is a rule.
Page 477 - and there grew up in consequence a general feeling that " it was a shame to tell Arnold a lie — he always believes one.
Page 505 - Thomas, because thou hast seen me, thou hast believed: blessed are they who have not seen, and yet have believed.
Page 221 - ... flos perpetuus rosarum ver agit perpetuum; candent lilia, rubescit crocus, sudat balsamum. virent prata, vernant sata, rivi mellis influunt; pigmentorum spirat odor, liquor et aromatum; pendent poma floridorum non lapsura nemorum. non alternat luna vices, sol vel cursus siderum; agnus est felicis urbis lumen inocciduum; nox et tempus desunt ei; diem fert continuum.
Page 233 - It is far from my wish to promulgate to the world that the ridiculous expectations, or rather professions, of the enthusiastic...
Page 495 - His mind rose above the state of things around him ; his spirit was solitary and kingly ; he was cramped by living among those as his equals, whom he felt fitted to guide as from some higher sphere ; and he retired at last to Liternum to breathe freely, to enjoy the simplicity of childhood, since he could not fulfil his natural calling to be a hero king.

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