Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry

Front Cover
Macmillan, 2005 - Medical - 1119 pages
13 Reviews
This undergraduate textbook describes the structure and function of the major classes of cellular constituents, and explains the physical, chemical, and biological context in which each biomolecule, reaction, and pathway operates. The fourth edition adds a chapter on the regulation of metabolism, reflects recent advances, and incorporates new experimental methodologies and an expanded and redesigned treatment of reaction mechanisms. Annotation : 2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com).
 

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User Review  - plaws595 - LibraryThing

I used this book in my undergraduate biochemistry course. I would have to say this is probably the best book to buy if you are looking for a good introduction on the many topics in biochemistry. The ... Read full review

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Contents

The Fatty Acid Synthase Reactions Are Repeated to Form Nitrogen Is Fixed by Enzymes of the Nitrogenase
1
Functional Genomics Shows the Allocations of Genes
38
STRUCTURE AND CATALYSIS
45
Entropy Increases as Crystalline Substances Dissolve
51
An Osmotic Event
59
Buffers Are Mixtures of Weak Acids and Their Conjugate
66
Amino Acids Peptides
75
Amino Acids Can Act as Acids and Bases
81
Conversion of Pyruvate to Phosphoenolpyruvate Requires
544
The Oxidative Phase Produces Pentose Phosphates
550
Pioneers in Glycogen Metabolism
566
Regulatory Enzymes Respond to Changes in Metabolite
572
Glycogen Synthase Is Also Regulated by Phosphorylation
586
The Contribution of Each Enzyme to Flux through
592
The Citric Acid Cycle
601
The Citric Acid Cycle Has Eight Steps
608

Polypeptides Have Characteristic Amino Acid
87
Unseparated Proteins Can Be Quantified
94
Amino Acid Sequences Can Also Be Deduced by Other
100
Amino Acid Sequences Provide Important Biochemical
106
The ThreeDimensional Structure
116
Box41 Knowing the Right Hand from the Left
122
Box42 Permanent Waving Is Biochemical Engineering
127
Globular Proteins Have a Variety of Tertiary Structures
134
Protein Motifs Are the Basis for Protein Structural
141
Amino Acid Sequence Determines Tertiary Structure
148
Protein Function
157
Hemoglobin Subunits Are Structurally Similar
163
Hemoglobin Also Transports H and CO2
170
Self Is Distinguished from Nonself by the Display of Peptides
176
Actin Myosin and Molecular Motors
182
Enzymes
190
A Few Principles Explain the Catalytic Power and Specificity
196
Mechanism
202
PreSteady State Kinetics Can Provide Evidence for Specific
208
Hexokinase Undergoes Induced Fit on Substrate Binding
218
In Many Pathways a Regulated Step Is Catalyzed by
226
Some Regulatory Enzymes Use Several Regulatory
232
Carbohydrates and Glycobiology
238
Monosaccharides Are Reducing Agents
244
Steric Factors and Hydrogen Bonding Influence
250
Proteoglycans Are GlycosaminoglycanContaining
256
Lectins Are Proteins That Read the Sugar Code and Mediate
262
Nucleotides and Nucleic Acids
273
DNA Stores Genetic Information
280
Messenger RNAs Code for Polypeptide Chains
287
Nucleotides and Nucleic Acids Undergo Nonenzymatic
293
Adenine Nucleotides Are Components of Many Enzyme
301
Restriction Endonucleases and DNA Ligase Yield
307
Specific DNA Sequences Are Detectable
314
Genome Sequences Provide the Ultimate Genetic
321
Detection of ProteinProtein Interactions Helps to Define
327
Manipulation of Animal Cell Genomes Provides Information
333
Lipids
343
Glycerophospholipids Are Derivatives of Phosphatidic
349
Sphingolipids at Cell Surfaces Are Sites of Biological
353
Steroid Hormones Carry Messages between Tissues
359
Adsorption Chromatography Separates Lipids of Different
365
All Biological Membranes Share Some Fundamental
371
Covalently Attached Lipids Anchor Some Membrane
378
Caveolins Define a Special Class of Membrane Rafts
385
Transporters Can Be Grouped into Superfamilies Based
391
The Neuronal Na Channel Is a VoltageGated
410
Biosignaling
421
VoltageGated Ion Channels Produce Neuronal Action
427
Receptor Guanylyl Cyclases Generate the Second Messenger
433
The 8Adrenergic Receptor Is Desensitized
439
Calcium Is a Second Messenger in Many Signal
442
Membrane Rafts and Caveolae May Segregate Signaling
451
Light Triggers Conformational Changes in the Receptor
457
Disruption of GProtein Signaling Causes Disease
464
CDKs Regulate Cell Division by Phosphorylating Critical
470
BIOENERGETICS AND METABOLISM
481
Principles of Bioenergetics
489
Other Phosphorylated Compounds and Thioesters Also Have
497
Glowing Reports of ATP
503
Reduction Potentials Measure Affinity for Electrons
509
Flavin Nucleotides Are Tightly Bound in Flavoproteins
515
Glycolysis Gluconeogenesis and
521
The Payoff Phase of Glycolysis Produces ATP
529
Dietary Polysaccharides and Disaccharides Undergo
535
Fermentation
538
The Energy of Oxidations in the Cycle Is Efficiently
614
The Citric Acid Cycle Is Regulated at Its Three Exergonic
622
Fatty Acid Catabolism
631
The Four 8Oxidation Steps Are Repeated to Yield Acetyl
639
Peroxisomes Also Carry Out 8 Oxidation
646
Ketone Bodies Are Overproduced in Diabetes and during
652
Dietary Protein Is Enzymatically Degraded to Amino
658
Box 181 Assays for Tissue Damage
664
Several Enzyme Cofactors Play Important Roles in Amino
672
Phenylalanine Catabolism Is Genetically Defective in Some
679
Asparagine and Aspartate Are Degraded
685
OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION
691
The Energy of Electron Transfer Is Efficiently Conserved
701
ATP Synthase Has Two Functional Domains
708
The Proton Gradient Drives the Release of ATP from
709
HARVESTING LIGHT ENERGY
723
Spatial Separation of Photosystems I and II Prevents Exciton
736
Carbohydrate Biosynthesis in Plants
751
Four Enzymes of the Calvin Cycle Are Indirectly Activated
764
LipidLinked Oligosaccharides Are Precursors for Bacterial
777
Fatty Acid Synthase Receives the Acetyl
790
Acetate Is Shuttled out of Mitochondria as Citrate 794 Several Classes of Reactions Play Special Roles in
797
Triacylglycerol Biosynthesis in Animals Is Regulated by 22 3 Molecules Derived from Amino Acids 854
804
Adipose Tissue Generates Glycerol 3phosphate by Heme Is the Source of Bile Pigments
854
Eukaryotic Pathways to Phosphatidylserine Arginine Is the Precursor for Biological Synthesis of Nitric
860
Carbamoyl Phosphate
867
Cholesterol Biosynthesis Is Regulated at Several Levels 825 Degradation of Purines and Pyrimidines Produces Uric Acid
873
and Related Molecules 833 23 Hormonal Regulation and Integration
881
The Discovery and Purification of Hormones Require
882
Hormone Release Is Regulated by a Hierarchy of Neuronal
889
Adipose Tissue Stores and Supplies Fatty Acids
897
Insulin Counters High Blood Glucose
904
40besity and the Regulation of Body Mass
910
ShortTerm Eating Behavior Is Set by Ghrelin
916
Genes and Chromosomes
923
Most Cellular DNA IS Underwound
932
Histones Are Small Basic Proteins
939
DNA Metabolism
948
Replication Is Very Accurate
954
Bacterial Replication Is Organized in MembraneBound
963
Box 251 DNA Repair and Cancer
970
The Interaction of Replication Forks with DNA Damage
976
Recombination Requires a Host of Enzymes and Other
982
Complete Chromosome Replication Can Require Site
988
RNA Metabolism
995
Transcription Is Regulated at Several Levels
1001
RNA Polymerase II Requires Many Other Protein Factors
1003
RNA Catalyzes the Splicing of Introns
1009
RNA Enzymes Are the Catalysts of Some Events in
1017
Some Retroviruses Cause Cancer and AIDS
1023
Box 263 The SELEX Method for Generating RNA Polymers with
1030
Wobble Allows Some tRNAs to Recognize More than
1039
The Ribosome Is a Complex Supramolecular Machine
1045
AminoacyltRNA Synthetases Attach the Correct
1051
Peptide Bonds Are Formed in the Elongation
1058
Nonsense
1065
Regulation of Gene Expression
1081
Regulatory Proteins Have Discrete DNABinding
1087
The lac Operon Undergoes Positive Regulation
1093
Some Genes Are Regulated by Genetic Recombination
1100
The Genes of Galactose Metabolism in Yeast Are Subject
1106
Appendix B Abbreviated Solutions to Problems AS1
1125
Credits
1139
Index
1153
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