Select Cases and Other Authorities on the Law of Property, Volume 1

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Harvard University Press, 1905 - Personal property
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Page 376 - June (1677) all declarations or creations of trusts or confidences of any lands, tenements, or hereditaments, shall be manifested and proved by some writing signed by the party who is by law enabled to declare such trust, or by his last will in writing, or else they shall be utterly void and of none effect.
Page 652 - Cartwright and her assigns for and during the term of her natural life, and from and immediately after her decease to...
Page 549 - The common law of England is not to be taken, in all respects, to be that of America. Our ancestors brought with them its general principles, and claimed it as their birthright; but they brought with them and adopted only that portion which was applicable to their condition.
Page 336 - ... the will of the giver according to the form in the deed of gift manifestly expressed shall be from henceforth observed, so that they to whom the land was given under such condition shall have no power to aliene the land so given, but that it shall remain unto the issue of them to whom it was given after their death, or shall revert unto the giver or his heirs if issue fail, either by reason that there is no issue at all, or if any issue be, it fail by death, the heir of such issue failing.
Page 49 - But our law, to guard against fraud, gives the entire property, without any account, to him whose original dominion is invaded, and endeavored to be rendered uncertain without his own consent.
Page 371 - That where any person or persons stand or be seised, or at any time hereafter shall happen to be seised, of and in any honors, castles, manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, reversions, remainders or other hereditaments, to the use, confidence or trust of any other person or persons...
Page 442 - ... that they were so intended lying on those who assert that they have ceased to be chattels; and that, on the contrary, an article which is affixed to the land, even slightly, is to be considered...
Page 443 - The only question therefore is, whether the machines when fixed were parcel of the freehold; and this is a question of fact, depending on the circumstances of each case, and principally on two considerations; first, the mode of annexation to the soil or fabric of the house, and the extent to which it is united to them, whether it can easily be removed integre, salve, et commode, or not, without injury to itself or the fabric of the building...
Page 548 - The general rule of the common law certainly is that whatever is once annexed to the freehold becomes part of it, and cannot afterward be removed, except by him who is entitled to the inheritance.
Page 266 - Trial in the Superior Court, without -a jury, before Blodgett, J., who allowed a bill of exceptions, in substance as follows : The...

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