Legacy

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Thorndike Press, Jan 1, 1987 - Social Science - 253 pages
2 Reviews
Norman Starr, called by the Senate investigating committee because of his National Security Council work in Nicaragua, recalls his ancestry of distinguished patriots while contemplating whether or not to "take the Fifth"

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User Review  - junebedell - LibraryThing

This is pretty much a lesson in history for fifth graders! I gave up half way through it. The story line traces a current day Army officer's family history, members of which just happen to be famous ... Read full review

Legacy

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

This timely short novel uses the Iran-contra affair as its point of departure to examine how the Constitution has influenced the United States and its citizens over the years. The central figure is ... Read full review

Contents

The Starrs
9
Jared Starr 17261787
23
Simon Starr 17591807
39
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

James A. Michener, 1907 - 1997 James Albert Michener was born on February 3, 1907 in Doylestown, Pa. He earned an A.B. from Swarthmore College, an A.M. from Colorado State College of Education, and an M.A. from Harvard University. He taught for many years and was an editor for Macmillan Publishing Company. His first book, "Tales of the South Pacific," derived from Michener's service in the Pacific in World War II, won the 1947 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and was the basis for the Rodgers and Hammerstein Broadway musical South Pacific, which won the 1950 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Michener completed close to 40 novels. Some other epic works include "Hawaii," "Centennial," "Space," and "Caribbean." He also wrote a significant amount of nonfiction including his autobiography "The World Is My Home." Among his many other honors, James Michener received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977. He was married to Patti Koon in 1935; they divorced in 1948. He married Vange Nord in 1948 (divorced 1955) and Mari Yoriko Sabusawa in 1955 (deceased 1994). He died in 1997 in Austin, Texas.

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