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Books Books 1 - 4 of 4 on ... about the taste the Africans have acquired for European commodities, there is....
" ... about the taste the Africans have acquired for European commodities, there is little reason to expect they will exert themselves, in the way of regular industry, in order to obtain those commodities. I rather think that they will sink back to their... "
A Letter to William Wilbeforce, Vice President of the African Institution ... - Page 47
by Robert Thorpe, William Wilberforce - 1815 - 84 pages
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A Letter to His Royal Highness the Duke of Gloucester: President ..., Volume 4

Zachary Macaulay - Africa - 1815 - 62 pages
...their former state, which is still the state of the natives two or three hundred miles inland. They wiH weave their own cloth, raise their own tobacco, smelt...for European goods ; for it can hardly be supposed that African rice will answer in the English market. Cotton, coffee, and sugar, were they to raise...
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Thoughts on the Abolition of the Slave Trade: And Civilization of Africa ...

Joseph Marryat - Slave trade - 1816 - 235 pages
...commodities. 1 rather think that they will sink back to their former state, wlrich is still the atate of the natives two or three hundred miles inland....for European goods; for it can hardly be supposed that African rice •will answer in the English market. Cotton, coffee, and sugar, wen; they to raise...
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The Edinburgh Review and the West Indies: With Observations on the Pamphlets ...

Colonist - Abolitionists - 1816 - 360 pages
...resume their bows and arrows. Be it remembered, that the greatest demand for rice (the staple commodity of the country) is to supply the slaves while kept in factories, or during the middle passage. The collection of rude produce is not industry; and if it were, how contemptible is its quantity, and...
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Blackwood's Magazine, Volume 21

1827
...rather think that they will SINK BACK to their former state, which is still the state of the nations two or three hundred miles inland. They will weave...while kept in factories, or during the middle passage. The collection of rude produce is not industry; and if it were, how contemptible is its quantity, and...
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