Strategic Basing and the Great Powers, 1200-2000

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Routledge, Nov 22, 2001 - History - 288 pages
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This is the first book to survey the evolution of the strategic basing systems of the great powers, covering an 800-year span of history, from the Mongol dynasty to the era of the US empire.

Robert E. Harkavy details the progression of strategic basing systems and power projection, from its beginnings at a regional level to its current global reach, while emphasizing the interplay between political and international systemic factors (bipolar vs. multipolar systems), and technological factors. Analyzing the relationship between basing structures and national power, the book deals with such key questions as: the co-mingling of military and commercial functions for bases; sea power; geopolitical theory; imperial ‘pick-off’ during hegemonic wars; base acquisitions; continuity between basing structures; and long-term shifts in basing functions.

Strategic Basing and the Great Powers, 1200-2000 will be of much interest to students of strategic studies, military history and international relations.

 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
Naval basing during an earlier age of sail
29
Venice Genoa Ottoman Empire Spain c12001600
32
4 Basing systems in the age of empire and sail
44
A transitional era
72
The bipolar base race
94
Basing in a unipolar system
147
Appendices
175
Notes
253
Index
271
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Robert E. Harkavy is Professor of Political Science at Pennsylvania State University.
Stephanie G. Neuman is Director of the Comparative Defense Studies Program and an Adjunct Professor in the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University.

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