How to Write a Novel: A Practical Guide to the Art of Fiction

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G. Richards, 1901 - Fiction - 211 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
12
III
21
IV
50
V
63
VI
79
VII
96
VIII
105
IX
116
X
138
XI
154
XII
164

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Page 194 - Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly, Though its answer little meaning — little relevancy bore; For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door, Bird or beast upon the sculptured bust above his chamber door, With such name as "Nevermore.
Page 193 - Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore. Not the least obeisance made he; not...
Page 72 - The broken sheds look'd sad and strange: Unlifted was the clinking latch; Weeded and worn the ancient thatch Upon the lonely moated grange. She only said, ' My life is dreary, He cometh not...
Page 188 - ... species of despair which delights in self-torture — propounds them not altogether because he believes in the prophetic or demoniac character of the bird ( which, reason assures him, is merely repeating a lesson learned by rote) but because he experiences a frenzied pleasure in so modeling his questions as to receive from the expected "Nevermore" the most delicious because the most intolerable of sorrow.
Page 191 - In general, to be found, it must be elaborately sought, and although a positive merit of the highest class, demands in its attainment less of invention than negation. Of course, I pretend to no originality in either the rhythm or metre of The Raven.
Page 198 - Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!
Page 182 - Beauty the province of the poem, simply because it is an obvious rule of Art that effects should be made to spring as directly as possible from their causes...
Page 196 - A raven, having learned by rote the single word "Nevermore" and having escaped from the custody of its owner, is driven at midnight through the violence of a storm to seek admission at a window from which a light still gleams — the chamber-window of a student, occupied half in poring over a volume, half in dreaming of a beloved mistress deceased.
Page 194 - Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore, — "Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou," I said, "art sure no craven, Ghastly grim and ancient Raven wandering from the Nightly shore: Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!
Page 181 - My next thought concerned the choice of an impression, or effect, to be conveyed ; and here I may as well observe that, throughout the construction I kept steadily in view the design of rendering the work wiiversally appreciable. I should be carried...

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