Albert Camus and the Philosophy of the Absurd

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Rodopi, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 193 pages
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This book is an attempt to read the totality of Camus s oeuvre as a voyage, in which Camus approaches the fundamental questions of human existence: What is the meaning of life? Can ultimate values be grounded without metaphysical presuppositions? Can the pain of the other penetrate the thick shield of human narcissism and self-interest? Solipsism and solidarity are among the destinations Camus reaches in the course of this journey. This book is a new reading of one of the towering humanists of the twentieth century, and sheds new light on his spiritual world."
 

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Contents

I
5
II
25
III
35
IV
43
V
47
VI
59
VII
67
VIII
87
IX
99
X
107
XI
117
XII
131
XIII
145
XIV
159
XV
173
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Page 17 - Man is but a reed, the most feeble thing in nature; but he is a thinking reed.
Page 11 - Let us then consider for the moment man alone, without outside assistance, armed solely with his own weapons, and deprived of divine grace and knowledge, which is his whole honor, his strength, and the foundation of his being. Let us see how much presence he has in this fine array. Let him help me to understand, by the force of his reason, on what foundations he has built these great advantages that he thinks he has over other creatures. Who has persuaded him that that admirable motion of the celestial...
Page 14 - The king is surrounded by persons whose only thought is to divert the king, and to prevent his thinking of self.

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About the author (2002)

Professor Avi Sagi teaches general and Jewish philosophy in the Department of Philosophy, Bar Ilan University, Israel. He is the founder and director of a graduate program of Hermeneutics at the university. He is also a senior research fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem. Sagi has published many books and articles in several areas: continental philosophy, philosophy of religion and ethics, current Jewish philosophy, philosophy and sociology of Jewish law. Among his books: Religion and Morality (with Daniel Statman); Judaism: Between Religion and Morality; Conversion and Jewish Identity (with Zvi Zohar); Elu va-Elu: A Study on the Meaning of Halakhic Discourse; Multiculturalism in a Democratic and Jewish State (with Menachem Mautner and Ronen Shamir); Kierkegaard, Religion, and Existence: The Voyage of the Self.

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