Lincoln: The Capital City and Lancaster County, Nebraska, Volume 2

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Andrew J. Sawyer
S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1916 - Lancaster Co., Ne
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Page 199 - His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day, although he does not seek nor desire public office.
Page 248 - He has been a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows since 1869, having been initiated into the fraternity that year as a member of Colony Lodge, No.
Page 303 - He exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the Republican party, but has never sought or desired office, preferring to give his time and attention to his business affairs, in which he is meeting with creditable and well-deserved success.
Page 143 - In Masonry he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and is also a member of the Mystic Shrine.
Page 152 - He maintained pleasant relations with his old army comrades through his membership in the Grand Army of the Republic.
Page 280 - Rite, and has also crossed the sands of the desert with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He...
Page 70 - Morton is a republican and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day but has never sought nor desired office.
Page 621 - ... sundries, and his trade has reached gratifying proportions, bringing him a substantial annual income. Mr. Long exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the republican party, with which he has been connected since attaining his majority.
Page 670 - The specific and distinctive office of biography is not to give voice to a man's modest estimate of himself and his accomplishments, but rather to leave the perpetual record establishing his character by the consensus of opinion on the part of his fellowmen.
Page 793 - He belongs to that class of men who wield a power which is all the more potent from the fact that it is moral rather than political and is exercised for the public weal rather than for personal ends.

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