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Books Books 1 - 9 of 9 on The Rights of the Subject are so secured by Law, that they cannot be deprived of....
" The Rights of the Subject are so secured by Law, that they cannot be deprived of the least Part of their Property, but by their own Consent... "
The Revolution in Virginia - Page 8
by Hamilton James Eckenrode - 1916 - 311 pages
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The Official Records of Robert Dinwiddie, Lieutenant-governor of ..., Volume 3

Virginia. Lieutenant Governor (1751-1758 : Dinwiddie) - United States - 1883
...Constit'n of this Gov't. The rights of the Subject are so secur'd by Law, that they cannot be depriv'd of the least Part of their Property, but by their Own consent. Upon this Excellent Principle is our Constit'n found'd, and ever since this Colony has had the Happiness...
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The colonies under the House of Hanover

John Andrew Doyle - United States - 1907
...that had yet been heard from any colonial body of the doctrine, no taxation without representation. "The rights of the subject are so secured by law that...part of their property but by their own consent." Dinwiddie's answer was as weak in substance as it was confused in expression. "The establishment of...
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The English in America: The colonies under the House of Hanover

John Andrew Doyle - New England - 1907
...that had yet been heard from any colonial body of the doctrine, no taxation without representation. 'The rights of the subject are so secured by law that...part of their property but by their own consent.' Dinwiddie's answer was as weak in substance as it was confused in expression. ' The establishment of...
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University of California Publications in History, Volume 1

History - 1914
...their liberties and to the constitution of the colony. "The Rights of-^ the Subject," they asserted, "are so secured by Law, that they cannot be deprived...Part of their Property, but by their own Consent." Upon this excellent principle, they said, their constitution had been founded, and the king had declared...
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University of California Publications in History, Volume 1, Issue 1

University of California, Berkeley - History - 1911
...their liberties and to the constitution of the colony. "The Bights of the Subject," they asserted, "are so secured by Law, that they cannot be deprived...Part of their Property, but by their own Consent." Upon this excellent principle, they said, their constitution had been founded, and the king had declared...
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Constitutional History of the American Revolution: The Authority of Rights

John Phillip Reid - History - 2003 - 374 pages
...concise language as did anyone writing before the Stamp Act. "The Rights of the Subjects," he explained, "are so secured by Law that they cannot be deprived of the least part of their property without their own consent. Upon this Principle of Law, the Liberty and Property of every Person who...
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Constitutional History of the American Revolution: The Authority of Rights

John Phillip Reid - History - 2003 - 374 pages
...concise language as did anyone writing before the Stamp Act. "The Rights of the Subjects," he explained, "are so secured by Law that they cannot be deprived of the least part of their property without their own consent. Upon this Principle of Law, the Liberty and Property of every Person who...
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Seasoned Judgments: The American Constitution, Rights, and History

Leonard W. Levy - Law
...fee for the use of his seal on each land patent, the assembly lectured him on the theme that subjects cannot be "deprived of the least part of their property but by their own consent: Upon this excellent principle is our constitution funded." The history of any colony would yield similar...
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Constitutional History of the American Revolution: The Authority to Tax

John Phillip Reid - History - 2003 - 419 pages
...1753, Virginia's Burgesses in an address to the governor declared that "The Rights of the Subjects are so secured by Law, that they cannot be deprived...Part of their Property, but by their own consent." Address of 28 November 1753, Journal of Burgesses 8:143. 38 The Maryland Gazette, 16 March 1748, p....
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