The Apples of New York, Volume 1

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J.B. Lyon, 1905 - Apples - 360 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
3
III
4
IV
18
V
20
VI
27
VII
41
VIII
53
XV
167
XVI
168
XVII
175
XVIII
179
XIX
196
XX
221
XXI
234
XXII
246

IX
80
X
83
XI
105
XII
123
XIII
139
XIV
155
XXIII
270
XXIV
297
XXV
336
XXVI
351
XXVII
353
XXVIII
381

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Page 27 - ... will insure their identity in catalogues or discussions D. Existing American names of varieties which conflict with earlier published foreign names of the same or other varieties, but which have become thoroughly established through long usage, shall not be displaced.
Page 10 - our Apples are, without doubt as good as those of England, and much fairer to look to, and so are the Pears, but we have not got all the Sorts. * * * Our People of late years, have run so much upon Orchards, that in a village near Boston, consisting of about forty Families, they made near ten Thousand Barrels [of cider].
Page 28 - Publication consists (1) in the distribution of a printed description of the variety named, giving the distinguishing characters of fruit, tree, etc., or (2) in the publication of a new name for a variety that is properly described elsewhere; such...
Page 33 - Pubescence. In some varieties there is a noticeable amount of fuzz or pubescence on and about the calyx. Color. The fruit may be striped with one or more shades of red. If it is not striped it may be called self-colored. A fruit may have a bronzed or blushed cheek and still be classed as self-colored in distinction from striped apples. It has already been remarked that the amount of color will vary on fruits of the same variety in different locations and in different seasons. In some cases trees...
Page 32 - York Imperial; medium in depth as in Baldwin or shallow as in Pewaukee. Calyx. The lobes of the outer green covering of the flower bud are called calyx lobes These persist in the common apple and when the fruit is ripe may still be found in what is commonly called the " blowend
Page 11 - Subsequently a considerable trade must have resulted, for in 1773 it was stated by the younger Collinson, that while the English apple crop had failed that year, American apples had been found an admirable substitute, some of the merchants having imported great quantities of them. In his words : " They are, notwithstanding, too expensive for common eating, being sold for two pence, three pence, and even four pence an apple. But their flavor is much superior to anything we can pretend to, and I even...
Page 27 - The paramount right of the originator, discoverer, or introducer of a new variety to name it, within the limitations of this code, is recognized and emphasized.
Page 375 - SYNONYM: HOLLAND'S RED WINTER. Winesap is one of the oldest and most popular apples in America. It is known in all the apple-growing sections from Virginia westward to the Pacific Coast. Like various other old varieties, Winesap has many seedlings which partake more or less of the characters of the parent. The best known of these are Arkansas, Arkansas Black, Paragon and Stayman Winesap. The tree is a rather vigorous though not particularly rank grower, comes into bearing early and...
Page 27 - ... limitations of this code, is recognized and emphasized. C. Where a variety name through long usage has become thoroughly established in American pomological literature for two or more varieties. it should not be displaced nor radically modified, for either sort, except in cases where a well-known synonym can be advanced to the position of leading name.
Page 330 - The part which is sour is not very tart, nor the other very sweet. Two apples, growing side by side on the same limb, will be often of these different tastes ; the one all sour, and the other all sweet. And, which is more remarkable, the same apple will frequently be sour one side, end, or part, and the other sweet, and that not in any order or uniformity; nor is there any difference in the appearance of one part from the other.

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