Proceedings of the United States National Museum, Volume 1

Front Cover
Smithsonian Institution Press, 1879 - Science
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 184 - The precipitous sides of this magnificent amphitheatre were fringed with various evergreens and aromatic shrubs, flowers, and many Alpine plants. On the north and south sides of the base of the cone were two pieces of water, one perfectly pure and tasteless, the oUier strongly impregnated with sulphur and alum. This...
Page 167 - April, and is soon found in abundance on the river banks and Lagoons. Migrating at night, it continually utters a very peculiar chattering whistle, which at once indicates its presence. Called by the Mexicans patos maizal, or Corn-field Duck, from its habit of frequenting those localities. It is by no means shy, and large numbers are offered for sale in the Brownsville market. Easily domesticated, it becomes very tame, roosting at night in trees with chickens and turkeys. When the females begin to...
Page 131 - I found a female eeneus hanging with a stout thread around her neck to a nest of the Bullock's Oriole. The nest contained one young one of this Cowbird, and it is probable that its parent, after depositing the egg, was entangled in the thread on hurriedly leaving the nest, and then died ; it had apparently been dead about two weeks. This case supports the view that the eggs or young of the owner are thrown out by the young parasite, and not removed by its parent, though I could find no trace of them...
Page 161 - I visited a large patch of tu!6reeds growing in a shallow lagoon, about ten miles from the fort, in which large numbers of this Ibis and several kinds of Herons were breeding. The reeds covered an area of perhaps seventy-five acres or less, growing in water three or four feet in depth.
Page 167 - Easily domesticated, it becomes very tame, roosting at night in trees with chickens and turkeys. When the females begin to lay, the males leave them and gather in large flocks on sand-bars in the river. My knowledge of the breeding habits is derived from Dr. SM Finley, USA, who had ample opportunity of observing these birds at Hidalgo. The eggs are deposited in hollow trees and branches, often at a considerable distance from water (two miles), and from eight to thirty feet or more from the ground.
Page 131 - June 20, containing three eggs of ceneus, while just beneath it was a whole egg of this parasite, also a broken one of this and of the Dwarf Cowbird. Two of the eggs in the nest were rotten ; the third, strange to say, contained a living embryo. As the nest was certainly deserted, I can only account for this by supposing that the...
Page 185 - Vincent,' says a writer describing the volcano which 'so disastrously broke out there in 1812, 'were fringed with various evergreens, and aromatic shrubs, flowers, and many Alpine plants. On the north and south sides of the base of the cone were two pieces of water, one perfectly pure and tasteless, the other strongly impregnated with sulphur and alum. This lonely and beautiful spot was rendered more enchanting by the singularly melodious notes of a bird, an inhabitant of those upper solitudes, and...
Page 313 - Herm are larger than those found in deeper water. In Alaska it has been obtained only with the dredge. The gills occupy a space corresponding to the posterior quarter of the foot; there are about eight or ten on each side. The mantle edge is plain and thick. The veil is plain. The muzzle is rounded, with a little papilla at the posterior corner on each side.
Page 322 - ... fathoms. Two hundred and eighty specimens examined of the typical form. The painting of this very characteristic species is very variable, even on different valves of the same individual. Nothing can appear more distinct than the coloration of typical specimens of some varieties, but in a large series the differences do not hold equally good. The number of slits is also somewhat variable, occasional abnormal or injured specimens having only six or seven slits in the tail-valve. But fine and normal...
Page 144 - Common summer visitor, arriving early in April. While var. henryi is usually found about prairies at some distance from houses, the present species is most plentiful just outsideof Brownsville, and I have found several sets of eggs within the fort. These are usually deposited in exposed situations, among sparse chaparral, on ground baked almost as hard as brick by the intense heat of the sun. One set of eggs was placed on a small piece of tin, within a fuot or two of a frequented path.

Bibliographic information