The World of the Revolutionary American Republic: Land, Labor, and the Conflict for a Continent

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Andrew Shankman
Routledge, Apr 16, 2014 - History - 478 pages

In its early years, the American Republic was far from stable. Conflict and violence, including major land wars, were defining features of the period from the Revolution to the outbreak of the Civil War, as struggles over who would control land and labor were waged across the North American continent. The World of the Revolutionary American Republic brings together original essays from an array of scholars to illuminate the issues that made this era so contested.

Drawing on the latest research, the essays examine the conflicts that occurred both within the Republic and between the different peoples inhabiting the continent. Covering issues including slavery, westward expansion, the impact of Revolutionary ideals, and the economy, this collection provides a diverse range of insights into the turbulent era in which the United States emerged as a nation.

With contributions from leading scholars in the field, both American and international, The World of the Revolutionary American Republic is an important resource for any scholar of early America.

 

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Contents

Conflict for a Continent Land Labor and the State in the First American Republic
1
ORIGINS OF THE REVOLUTIONARY AMERICAN REPUBLIC
25
THE QUEST FOR CONTINENTAL CONTROL
95
THE EMERGENCE OF A CONTINENTAL HEGEMON
293
Index
457
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About the author (2014)

Andrew Shankman is an Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University, Camden, and a Senior Research Associate at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies. He is the author of Crucible of American Democracy: The Struggle to Fuse Egalitarianism and Capitalism in Jeffersonian Pennsylvania and over a dozen articles on the early American Republic. He has received the Ralph D. Gray Prize from the Society of the Historians of the Early American Republic and the Program in Early American Society and Economy article prize, both for his scholarly work.

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