The Crusade of Richard I, 1189-92: Extracts from the Itinerarium Ricardi Bohâdin, Ernoul, Roger of Howden

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D. Nutt, 1888 - Crusades - 395 pages
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Page 9 - Henry, by the grace of God, king of England, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and count of Anjou, to the convent of Christ Church, Canterbury, greeting, and by God's mercy on his return to England, peace.
Page 376 - Then he would introduce them into his garden, some four, or six, or ten at a time, having first made them drink a certain potion which cast them into a deep sleep, and then causing them to be lifted and carried in. So when they awoke, they found themselves in the Garden, in a place so charming, they deemed that it was Paradise in very truth.
Page 331 - And the Lord said, Because the cry of Sodom and Gomorrah is great, and because their sin is very grievous, I will go down now, and see whether they have done altogether according to the cry of it, which is come unto me; and if not, I will know.
Page 376 - He had caused a certain valley between two mountains to be enclosed, and had turned it into a garden, the largest and most beautiful that ever was seen, filled with every variety of fruit. In it were erected pavilions and palaces the most elegant that can be imagined, all covered with gilding and exquisite painting. And there were runnels too, flowing freely with wine and milk and honey and water; and numbers of ladies and...
Page 56 - ... king of England was going to marry. On the fourth day queen Eleanor went back to England, intending to pass through Rome ; and when she had gone the king of Navarre's daughter remained in the guardianship of the king of England, together with his sister Joan queen of Sicily. 1191, 13 April. — King Philip reaches Acre. Rigord, 33. But Philip the king of the Franks, earnestly desiring to finish the journey he had begun, set sail in March and after a few days, having a favourable breeze, reached...
Page ii - ... the effect produced upon each generation by the political, religious, social, and intellectual movements in which it took part. Extracts from foreign tongues are Englished, and passages from old English authors put into modern spelling, but otherwise as far as may be kept in original form. When needed a glossary is added and brief explanatory notes. To each volume is also appended a short account of the writers quoted and of their relations to the events they describe, as well as such tables...
Page 6 - Regis Ricardi, ii., c. 45. The Lord of the ages had given him [Richard] such generosity of soul and endued him with such virtues that he seemed rather to belong to earlier times than these. . . His was the valour of Hector, the magnanimity of Achilles ; he was no whit inferior to Alexander,f or less than Roland in manhood. Of a truth he easily surpassed the more praiseworthy characters of our time in many ways. His right hand, like that of a second Titus, scattered riches...
Page 7 - He was lofty in stature, of a shapely build, with hair half-way between red and yellow. His limbs were straight and flexible, his arms somewhat long and, for this very reason, better fitted than those of most folk to draw or wield the sword. Moreover he had long legs, matching the character of his whole frame. His features showed the ruler, while his manners and his bearing added not a little to his general presence. Not only could he claim the loftiest position and praise in virtue of his noble...
Page 375 - ... parallel story in Ibn Batuta. When he was at the court of the pagan king of Mul-Java (which is certainly not Java, as the editors make it, but, as I hope to show elsewhere, Cambodia, or some country on the main in that quarter), he says, " I one day saw, in the assembly of this prince, a man with a long knife in his hand, which he placed upon his own neck ; he then made a long speech, not a word of which I could understand ; he then firmly grasped the knife, and its sharpness, and the force with...
Page 328 - PREAUX. where there had been none before. Then having received leave to depart from Jerusalem the party returned to Acre. 1192, Oct. 9.— Richard leaves the Holy Land and sets sail from Acre. Itin. Ric., v. Now some people in their foolish talk were wont to say that the pilgrims had done very little good in the land of Jerusalem because they had not freed the city. Such speech, however, was only ignorant babble of men without knowledge. But we deem ourselves worthy of credence, for we saw and experienced...

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