General Theory of Knowledge

Front Cover
Open Court Publishing, 1974 - Philosophy - 410 pages
2 Reviews
First published in Germany in 1918, this acutely reasoned treatise attacks many of philosophy’s contemporary sacred cows, including the concept of metaphysics and Kant’s arguments for synthetic a priori knowledge. The book expounds most of the doctrines that would later be identified with the "classical period” of the Vienna Circle. Unlike many of his peers, Schlick displays a detailed and sensitive knowledge of the traditions he criticizes, displayed here in the chief work of this pioneering Viennese philosopher.
 

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An excellent and underrated work from an excellent and underrated philosopher. The General Theory of Knowledge is Schlick's attempt to give an account of thought and language that could fulfill the ... Read full review

Review: General Theory of Knowledge

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it is the best Read full review

Contents

The Nature of Knowledge
1
Knowing in Everyday Life
4
Knowing in Science
9
Knowing by Means of Images
15
Knowing by Means of Concepts
20
The Limits of Definition
27
Implicit Definitions
31
The Nature of Judgments
39
ThingsInThemselves and the Notion of Immanence
194
Critique of the Notion of Immanence
203
Unperceived Things as Real
204
Unperceived Things as Unreal
216
b Objects Perceived by Several Individuals
224
B Knowledge of the Real
233
The Subjectivity of Time
244
The Subjectivity of Space
251

Judging and Knowing
48
What is Truth?
59
Definitions Conventions and Empirical Judgments
69
What Knowledge is Not
79
SoCalled Inner Perception 151
86
On the Value of Knowledge
94
Problems of Thought
102
The Analytic Character of Rigorous Inference
107
A Skeptical Consideration of Analysis
116
The Unity of Consciousness
122
The Relationship of the Psychological to the Logical
135
On SelfEvidence
147
Verification
162
Problems of Reality
171
Naive and Philosophical Viewpoints on the Question of Reality
175
The Temporality of the Real
188
The Subjectivity of the Sense Qualities
264
Quantitative and Qualitative Knowledge
272
The Physical and the Mental
289
More on the Psychophysical Problem
301
Objections to Parallelism
314
Monism Dualism Pluralism
325
The Validity of Knowledge of Reality
333
Thinking and Being
334
Knowing and Being
342
Is There a Pure Intuition?
348
Are There Pure Forms of Thought?
358
On Categories
366
On Inductive Knowledge
384
Index of Names
401
Subject Index
405
Copyright

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About the author (1974)

Moritz Schlick studied at Berlin under Max Planck (see Vol. 5) and received his Ph.D. in physics in 1904. He taught at Rostock and Kiel before joining the faculty at Vienna in 1922. His early work, General Theory of Knowledge (1918), reveals his commitment to realism and to the experimental method in scientific and philosophical knowledge. At Vienna he led the Vienna Circle of logical positivism and was instrumental in recruiting Rudolf Carnap. The publication of Ludwig Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (1921) influenced radically the subsequent development of his thought. Increasingly he stressed the empirical verification criterion for truth and meaning and became severely critical of statements in philosophy and elsewhere that could not meet this criterion. Hence the logical positivists whom he led became notorious for their thesis that metaphysics in non-sense. His mature epistemology was presented in the publication of the second edition of his General Theory of Knowledge (1925). He also advanced a noncognitivist theory of ethical statements in his book Problems of Ethics (1939).

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