India After Gandhi: The History of the World's Largest Democracy

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Pan Macmillan, Feb 10, 2011 - History - 300 pages
16 Reviews

Born against a background of privation and civil war, divided along lines of caste, class, language and religion, independent India emerged, somehow, as a united and democratic country. Ramachandra Guha’s hugely acclaimed book tells the full story – the pain and the struggle, the humiliations and the glories – of the world’s largest and least likely democracy.

While India is sometimes the most exasperating country in the world, it is also the most interesting. Ramachandra Guha writes compellingly of the myriad protests and conflicts that have peppered the history of free India. Moving between history and biography, the story of modern India is peopled with extraordinary characters. Guha gives fresh insights into the lives and public careers of those long-serving Prime Ministers, Jawaharlal Nehru and Indira Gandhi. But the book also writes with feeling and sensitivity about lesser-known (though not necessarily less important) Indians – peasants, tribals, women, workers and musicians.

Massively researched and elegantly written, India After Gandhi is a remarkable account of India’s rebirth, and a work already hailed as a masterpiece of single volume history. This tenth anniversary edition, published to coincide with seventy years of India’s independence, is revised and expanded to bring the narrative up to the present.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - RajivC - LibraryThing

The history of India has been confusing, and he does a marvellous job of covering the events during the tumultuous years since we became an independent country. The tragedy of having the Nehru-Gandhi ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - cstebbins - LibraryThing

respectful "mainstream" history of recent India, centering on the alleged virtues of Mr. Nehru. Just because something is conventional doesn't mean it's unimportant. After all India does have a free ... Read full review

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Contents

Preface to the Second Edition
Unnatural Nation
PART ONE PICKING UP THE PIECES
x
Freedom and Parricide
xi
The Logic of Division
xxix
Apples in the Basket
xxxvii
A Valley Bloody and Beautiful
lviii
Refugees and the Republic
v
PART FOUR THE RISE OF POPULISM
xxx
War and Succession
i
Leftward Turns
xvi
The Elixir of Victory
xvi
The Rivals
xi
Autumn of the Matriarch
iii
Life Without the Congress
v
Democracy in Disarray
xvi

Ideas of India
ii
PART TWO NEHRUS INDIA
xv
The Biggest Gamble in History
xvi
Home and the World
vii
Redrawing the
xi
The Conquest of Nature
vii
The Law and the Prophets
xi
Securing Kashmir
viii
Tribal Trouble
ix
PART THREE SHAKING THE CENTRE
xxiv
The Southern Challenge
i
The Experience of Defeat
xi
Peace in Our Time
i
Minding the Minorities
xi
This Son also Rises
xix
PART FIVE A HISTORY OF EVENTS
xviii
Rights and Riots
xix
A Multipolar Polity
xlii
Rulers and Riches
i
Progress and its Discontents
xvi
The Rise of the BJP Systems
xix
A 5050 Democracy
xvii
Acknowledgements
xviii
Notes
xxi
Index
2021
List of Illustrations
RWC-73
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Ramachandra Guha has taught at Yale, Stanford, Oslo, and the Indian Institute of Science. His other books include A Corner of a Foreign Field and Environmentalism: A Global History. His awards include the UK Cricket Society’s Literary Award and the Leopold-Hidy Prize of the American Society of Environmental History. In May 2008, Prospect and Foreign Policy magazines nominated Guha as one of the world’s one hundred most influential intellectuals. In 2009, he was awarded the Padma Bhushan for services to literature and education.

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