The American nations; or, Outlines of their general history, ancient and modern

Front Cover
C. S. Rafinesque, 1836
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 245 - Ashinists, or Essenians, the best sect of Jews, placed Paradise in the Western Ocean; and the Id. Alishe, or Elisha of the Prophets, the happy land. Jezkal (our Ezekiel) mentions that island ; the Phoenicians called it Alizut, and some deem Madeira was meant, but it had neither men nor spirits ! From this the Greeks made their Elysium and Tartarus placed near together, at first in Epirus, then Italy, next Spain, lastly in the ocean, as the settlers travelled west. The sacred and blessed islands of...
Page 245 - It is strange but true that, throughout the earth, the place of departed souls, the land of spirits, was supposed to be in the West, or at the setting sun. This happens everywhere, and in the most opposite religions, from China to Lybia, and also from Alaska to Chili in America. The instances of an eastern paradise were few, and referred to the eastern celestial abode of yore, rather than the future abode of souls. The...
Page 72 - For as to the style and language, it admits but of little improvement ; but, in respect of the sense and the accuracy of interpretation, the improvements of which it is capable are great and numberless.
Page 248 - But all these notions have earlier foundations, since the English Druids put their paradise in a remote island in the west, called "Flath-Innis", the flat island', &c. — American Nations, vol. ii, p. 245. et infra.' "The coincidence then is this. The same veneration for the West prevails among many of our Indian tribes, who place their Paradise in an island beyond the Great Lake (Pacific), and far towards the setting sun.
Page 122 - Tien-hia or Celestial Region, (universe) was ruled by benevolent monarchs who took nothing and gave much; all the world submitted to their virtues and good laws. They wore no crown, but long hair; never made war and put no one to death. Harmony even reigned between men ano! animals; men lived on' roots, fruits and cattle, they did not follow hunting, property was in common, and universal concord prevailed.
Page 248 - And farther he says, the Gauls had their Cocagne, the Saxons their Cockaign, Cocana of the Lusitanians, — " 'A land of delight and plenty, which is proverbial to this day I By the Celts it was called "Dunna feadhuigh", a fairy land, etc.
Page 245 - ... the most opposite religions, from China to Lybia, and also from Alaska to Chili in America. The instances of an eastern paradise were few, and referred to the eastern celestial abode of yore, rather than the future abode of souls. The Ashinists, or Essenians, the best sect of Jews, placed Paradise in the Western Ocean; and the Id Alishe, or Elisha of the Prophets, the happy land. Jezkal (our Ezekiel) mentions that island; the Phoenicians called it Alizut and some deem Madeira was meant, but it...
Page 246 - ... in the ocean, as the settlers travelled west. The sacred and blessed islands of the Hindus and Lybians were in this ocean ; Wilford thought they meant the British Islands. Pushcara, the farthest off, he says, was Iceland, but may have meant North America. " The Lybians called their blessed islands ' Aimones;' they were the Canaries, it is said, but likely the Atlantides, since the Atlantes dwelt in the Aimones,

Bibliographic information