History of civilization in England, Volume 1

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D. Appleton and co., 1858 - England
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Contents

From Central America 07
67
Greater power of the church in France than in England
81
And from Mexico and Peru 68
85
Also by an unhealthy climate making life precarious 9193 From these causes the civilizations exterior to Europe are mainly
95
Further illustration from Central America 105 Chemical and physiological note on the connexion between food
107
The historical method of studying mental laws is superior to
113
Examination of the two metaphysical methods of generalizing men
118
The progress of society is twofold moral and intellectual
123
The standard of action having varied in every age the causes
129
The diminution of religious persecution is owing to the progress
136
As civilization advances men of intellect avoid becoming soldiers
142
The discoveries made by political economists 150158
151
The application of steam to purposes of travelling 158160
158
CHAPTER V
164
Comparison of the history of England with that of France 169171
169
Hence in France during the sixteenth century every thing was more
173
Necessity of ascertaining the fundamental laws of intellectual pro
176
Influence of religion on the progress of society 184191
184
And from Sweden and Scotland 191193
191
Influence of government on the progress of society
197
They have also increased hypocrisy and perjury 204205
204
An inquiry into the changes in historical researches will throw light
215
But the most active cause of all was the influence of the clergy 222223
222
Illustration of this from the history of Charlemagne by Turpin 231232
231
And in the predictions of Stoeffler respecting the Deluge
239
OUTLINE OF THE HISTORY OP THE ENGLISH INTELLECT FROM TnB MIDDLE
241
Hooker contrasted with Jewel 248249
248
XJreat advantage of this 254259
254
These improvements were due to the sceptical and inquiring spirit 279280
279
This alliance was dissolved by the Declaration of Indulgence 286287
286
Hostility between them and William III
293
After the Revolution the ablest men confined themselves to secular
299
Ignorance of George III
310
Deterioration of the House of Lords
324
Ability and accomplishments of Burke
350
The nobles displace the clergy and celibacy is opposed by the prin
360
It was also seen in the wars of the Fronde 433 But notwithstanding all this there was a great difference between
438
In England the nobles were less powerful than in France
444
This state contrasted with that of England
450
Illustration from the history of chivalry
456
Analogy between the Reformation and the revolutions of the seven
462
and Charles I vainly attempted to restore their power
468
But in France the energy of the protective spirit and the power
477
As such men were the leaders of the Fronde the rebellion naturally
483
CHAPTER XL
490
Servility in the reign of Louis XIV 491498
491
Men of letters grateful to Louis XIV
499
Also in zoology and in chemistry
505
Illustrations from the history of French art 511512
511
CHAPTER XII
517
Admiration of England expressed by Frenchmen
528
In France literature was the last resource of liberty
541
Hence they were led to assail Christianity 547550
547
CHAPTER XIII
553
Still further progress early in the seventeenth century 557560
557
Illustration of this from the work of Audigier 566568
566
Immense improvements introduced by Voltaire
575
His views adopted by Mallet Mably Velly Villaret Duclos
582
He weakened the authority of mere scholars and theologians
588
The discourses of Turgot and their influence
596
The intellect of France began to attack the state about 1750 602603
602
Abolition of the Jesuits
608
Jansenism being allied to Calvinism its revival in France aided
614
But was averted for a time by the most eminent Frenchmen direct
618
And in Condillac
627
In England daring the same period there was a dearth of great thinkers 636638
636
Relation between inventions discoveries and method and immense importance of Bichats method 645648
645
Great and successful efforts made by the French in botany 652654
652
All these vast results were part of the causes of the French Revolu
658
And in the establishment of clubs 664666
664
General reflections 670
670

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Page 129 - To do good to others ; to sacrifice for their benefit your own wishes ; to love your neighbour as yourself; to forgive your enemies; to restrain your passions; to honour your parents; to respect those who are set over you : these, and a few others, are the sole essentials of morals; but they have been known for thousands of years, and not one jot or tittle has been added to them by all the sermons, homilies, and text-books which moralists and theologians have been able to produce.
Page 20 - In a given state of society, a certain number of persons must put an end to their own life. This is the general law; and the special question as to who shall commit the crime depends of course upon special laws; which, however, in their total action, must obey the large social law to which they are subordinate.
Page 335 - The storm has gone over me; and I lie like one of those old oaks which the late hurricane has scattered about me. I am stripped of all my honours, I am torn up by the roots, and lie prostrate on the earth!
Page 333 - ... necessary to consider distinctly the true nature and the peculiar circumstances of the object which we have before us: because, after all our struggle, whether we will or not, we must govern America according to that nature and to those circumstances, and not according to our own imaginations...
Page 257 - ... the chief, perhaps the only, English writer who has any claim to be considered an ecclesiastical historian, is the infidel Gibbon.
Page 174 - Commentaries in America as in England. General Gage marks out this disposition very particularly in a letter on your table. He states, that all the people in his government are lawyers, or smatterers in law ; and that in Boston they have been enabled, by successful chicane, wholly to evade many parts of one of your capital penal constitutions.
Page 264 - For my part, I have ever believed (and do now know) that there are witches." They that doubt of these do not only deny them but spirits, and are obliquely and upon consequence a sort, not of infidels, but atheists.
Page 333 - America, if she has taxable matter in her, to tax herself. I am not here going into the distinctions of rights, nor attempting to mark their boundaries. I do not enter into these metaphysical distinctions. I hate the very sound of them.
Page 127 - ... and other personal peculiarities, that we must consider this alleged progress as a very doubtful point; and in the present state of our knowledge we cannot safely assume that there has been any permanent improvement in the moral or intellectual faculties of man; nor have we any decisive ground for saying that these faculties are likely to be greater in an infant born in the most civilized part of Europe than in one born in the wildest region of a barbarous country.
Page 156 - Well may it be said of Adam Smith, and said, too, without fear of contradiction, that this solitary Scotchman has, by the publication of one single work, contributed more towards the happiness of man, than has been effected by the united abilities .of all the statesmen. and legislators of whom history has preserved an authentic account.

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