The Painted Word

Front Cover
Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Oct 14, 2008 - Art - 128 pages

"America's nerviest journalist" (Newsweek) trains his satirical eye on Modern Art in this "masterpiece" (The Washington Post)

Wolfe's style has never been more dazzling, his wit never more keen. He addresses the scope of Modern Art, from its founding days as Abstract Expressionism through its transformations to Pop, Op, Minimal, and Conceptual. The Painted Word is Tom Wolfe "at his most clever, amusing, and irreverent" (San Francisco Chronicle).

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
1
4 stars
2
3 stars
2
2 stars
2
1 star
0

THE PAINTED WORD

User Review  - Kirkus

No question about it, Tom Wolfe is speaking for the yahoos in this little essay—it appeared in its entirety in Harper's Magazine, and though the Art World will no doubt assiduously ignore Wolfe's ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - giovannigf - LibraryThing

The defender of the bourgeoisie takes on the art world, or at least his idea of the art world. Entertaining, but infuriating if you know anything about art. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
6
Section 3
8
Section 4
17
Section 5
49
Section 6
58
Section 7
72
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Tom Wolfe (1930-2018) was one of the founders of the New Journalism movement and the author of such contemporary classics as The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Right Stuff, and Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers, as well as the novels The Bonfire of the Vanities, A Man in Full, and I Am Charlotte Simmons. As a reporter, he wrote articles for The Washington Post, the New York Herald Tribune, Esquire, and New York magazine, and is credited with coining the term, “The Me Decade.”

Among his many honors, Tom was awarded the National Book Award, the John Dos Passos Award, the Washington Irving Medal for Literary Excellence, the National Humanities Medal, and the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

A native of Richmond, Virginia, he earned his B.A. at Washington and Lee University, graduating cum laude, and a Ph.D. in American studies at Yale. He lived in New York City.

Bibliographic information