Auditory Archaeology: Understanding Sound and Hearing in the Past

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Routledge, Jun 16, 2016 - Social Science - 324 pages
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Auditory archaeology considers the potential contribution of everyday, mundane and unintentional sounds in the past and how these may have been significant to people. Steve Mills explores ways of examining evidence to identify intentionality with respect to the use of sound, drawing on perception psychology as well as soundscape and landscape studies of various kinds. His methodology provides a flexible and widely applicable set of elements that can be adapted for use in a broad range of archaeological and heritage contexts. The outputs of this research form the case studies of the Teleorman River Valley in Romania, Çatalhöyük in Turkey, and West Penwith, a historical site in the UK.This fascinating volume will help archaeologists and others studying human sensory experiences in the past and present.
 

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Contents

List of Figures
7
List of Tables
9
Preface and Acknowledgments
11
Part One
15
Part Two
103
Appendix 1 Definitions and Technical Details on the Physical Properties of Sound the Characteristics of Human Hearing Acoustics and Technologies ...
243
Appendix 2 Procedures for Primary Data Collection and Analysis for the Teleorman River Valley Case Study
259
Appendix 3 Procedures for Recording and Documenting the Contemporary Sonic Fabric at Çatalhöyük Including a Written Account of the Contempo...
263
Appendix 4 Procedures for Primary Data Collection and Analysis for the West Penwith Case Study
275
Notes
279
References
295
Index
315
About the Author
324
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