Remains of the Jews: The Holy Land and Christian Empire in Late Antiquity

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Stanford University Press, 2004 - History - 249 pages
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Remains of the Jews studies the rise of Christian Empire in late antiquity (300-550 C.E.) through the dense and complex manner in which Christian authors wrote about Jews in the charged space of the “holy land.” The book employs contemporary cultural studies, particularly postcolonial criticism, to read Christian writings about holy land Jews as colonial writings. These writings created a cultural context in which Christians viewed themselves as powerful—and in which, perhaps, Jews were able to construct a posture of resistance to this new Christian Empire. Remains of the Jews reexamines familiar types of literature—biblical interpretation, histories, sermons, letters—from a new perspective in order to understand how power and resistance shaped religious identities in the later Roman Empire.

 

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Contents

Jews and the Totality
21
The Production
56
Jews
103
Christian Jerusalem
139
Reconsidering JewishChristian
200
Bibliography
211
Index
245
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About the author (2004)

Andrew S. Jacobs is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at the University of California, Riverside.

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