Hoaryhead, and the Vallies Below: Or, Truth Through Fiction

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Crocker & Brewster, 1838 - Child rearing - 308 pages
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Page 109 - It is written in the prophets, And they shall be all taught of God. Every man therefore that hath heard, and hath learned of the Father, cometh unto me.
Page 168 - ... quill thrust through the cork, in the chimney corner. But I am describing the store in a winter's day, while this story is meant to open in the summer, between haying and harvesting. The fire was dead, and a great tin fender concealed the ashes and brands. The chairs were...
Page 306 - He turned around, away from the little girl, his mind poised in equilibrium, and just then his eye fell upon the baton of the sheriff standing in the corner of the entry — the painted badge of his office — the symbol of disgrace, and ignominy, and miserable solitude — of bolts, and bars, and gloomy cells of stone. It furnished just the touch necessary to burst the bubble. M'Donner said hastily that he would not wait then, but perhaps would call again. " I think he will be in very soon, sir,"...
Page 169 - ... post-office. The mail came once a week, bringing a few newspapers and sometimes some letters. The company which was collected on this occasion were not interested so much in the contents of the mail, as in a new team of horses, and a large coach, which was that day for the first time to be put on the road. They were looking off beyond the bridge, where the road could be seen for a considerable distance winding around a hill, and talking with noisy laughter about various subjects that came up....
Page 169 - ... of the mail as in a new team of horses and a large coach, which was that day for the first time to be put on the road. They were looking off beyond the bridge, where the road could be seen for a considerable distance winding around a hill, and talking with noisy laughter about various subjects that came up. By the side of the door, outside, his chair tipped back against the side of the building and his feet resting upon a bar which passed along between two posts placed there for fastening horses,...
Page 168 - It was a calm and pleasant afternoon; the forests around were in their best dress, and the view up the pond was picturesque in the highest degree. But the company paid little attention to the beauty of the scenery. They were looking out for the " stage." Mr. Shubael was the postmaster. A little high paling, at the end of the counter opposite the fire, was the post-office. The mail came once a week, bringing a few newspapers and sometimes some letters. The company which was collected on this occasion...
Page 169 - McDonner seemed inclined to be silent. He allowed the others to talk, and laugh, paying, himself, apparently little attention. They however often appealed to him, and though he seemed reluctant to be drawn out into conversation, yet when he did speak, it was in language so rough and decided...

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