Woodland Conservation and Management

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Sep 30, 1993 - Nature - 374 pages
New edition of book which is a course text in woodland conservation and management. The text has been updated throughout and has a major new chapter dealing with developments in conservation and management policies over the last ten years in a European context, including developments in vegetation classification systems and outcomes of management policies.
 

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Contents

Original natural woodland
3
12 Atlantic forests in Britainzz
6
13 Natural woodland since the Atlantic periodz
9
Ancient woodland and traditional management
11
22 Common woods and the origins of wood pasture
12
23 Forests chases and deer parks
13
24 Coppice management
17
25 Origins and trends in coppice management
24
123 Forestry and nature conservation in Britain
197
124 Objectives of nature conservation in woodlands
199
125 Priorities in species conservation
200
126 Priorities in woodland habitat conservation
201
127 Other features of interest
203
Observation and recording in woodlands
205
133 Bank and ditch maps
208
134 Species lists
212

26 Woodland in Scotland
30
27 Distribution of ancient woodland
34
Ecological characteristics of ancient woods
42
32 Soils of primary woodland
44
33 Flora of ancient coppice woodlands
46
34 Cyclic effects of coppicing on the flora
52
35 Natural features in existing coppices
56
36 Flora of ancient wood pasture
59
37 Fauna of ancient woodland
62
High forest management
66
42 Shelterwood systems
69
43 Selection system
72
44 Conversion of coppice to high forest
74
45 Flora fauna and soils of high forest
76
Recent secondary woodland
79
52 Natural succession to woodland
82
53 Afforestation
84
54 Effects of upland afforestation on flora and fauna
87
55 The flora of lowland secondary woods
91
Longterm changes in the woodland flora
97
62 Island theory and British woods
99
Types of seminatural woodland in Britain
105
Woodland classification
107
72 Principles and approaches to woodland classification
108
73 A new classification of seminatural stand types
111
Types of ancient seminatural woodland
117
82 Ashwych elm woodland Group 1
119
83 Ashmaple woodland Group 2
125
84 Hazelash woodland Group 3
130
85 Ashlime woodland Group 4
135
86 Oaklime woodland Group 5
139
87 Birchoak woodland Group 6
141
88 Alder woodland Group 7
148
89 Beech woodland Group 8
156
810 Hornbeam woodland Group 9
163
811 Suckering elm woodland Group 10
167
812 Pine woodland Group 11
170
813 Birch woodland Group 12
171
814 Conspectus of stand types in British ancient seminatural woodland
173
Management variants of stand types
175
92 Wood pasture variants
176
94 Improved stands
177
95 Plantation of native species
178
Succession and stand types
179
102 Scrub types
181
103 Cyclic changes
182
104 Longterm successions
183
British woodland types in a European context
185
112 Class Salicetea Purpureae
186
115 Class Quercetea RoboriPetraeae
187
116 Class QuercoFagetea
188
Woodland nature conservation
191
Objectives and priorities of nature conservation in British woodlands
193
122 Wilderness and nature conservation
195
135 Distribution of species within woods
214
136 Vegetation maps
218
137 Stand structure
224
138 Monitoring
227
139 Management records
229
Assessment of woodlands for nature conservation
231
their value for nature conservation
232
the example of Foxley Wood
238
144 Comparisons between woods
240
145 Site comparisons based on species counts
243
146 How many sites are needed?
246
147 Assessments of parts of contiguous woodland
247
Management for nature conservation
251
Planning for nature conservation within forestry
253
152 Strategic principles
255
154 Natural areas considered as management units
256
155 Sites as units for nature conservation
259
Pattern and redistribution of woodland
261
163 Afforestation and nature conservation
265
164 Assessment of changes in woodland pattern
267
165 Afforestation by natural succession
269
Nature conservation aspects of woodland management
270
choice and distribution of species
271
174 Structure and management systems
273
natural regeneration and planting
275
176 Rides and other subsidiary habitats
277
178 Management recording
279
179 Plantation management in the uplands
280
Management of seminatural woodland
281
value and prospects
284
184 Alternatives to traditional management
289
185 Nature reserves in woodlands
292
Integration of nature conservation with other objectives of woodland management
295
193 The main categories of British woodland
296
194 Ancient seminatural woodland
297
195 Future developments
298
197 Discussion
300
British woodland management in a European context
303
202 Woodland management
305
203 Forestry and nature conservation
307
Woodland conservation and management 19811992
310
212 Other aspects of woodland ecology
315
213 Classification
318
214 Survey assessment and inventory
320
215 Changes in woodland pattern and extent
324
216 Policy developments
330
217 Woodland conservation management
334
218 Upland forest management
338
219 Creating new native woodlands
341
2110 A new relationship between forestry and nature conservation
344
References
347
Site index
364
Subject index
369
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 351 - Hammond, PM, 1974 Changes in the British coleopterous fauna, in The changing flora and fauna of Britain...
Page 347 - Studies of the woodland light climate. II. Seasonal variation in the light climate. J. Ecol., 52, 643-663.
Page 358 - Ratcliffe, PR, The control of red and sika deer populations in commercial forests, in Mammals as Pests, Putman, RJ, Ed., Chapman & Hall, London, 1989, 98.
Page 348 - Centre for Agricultural Strategy (1980). Strategy for the UK Forest Industry. (CAS report no.
Page 350 - V. 1986. Soil acidification and vegetation changes in deciduous forest in southern Sweden. Oecologia 70: 339-347.
Page 363 - An account of the Leigh Woods, in the parish of Long Ashton, County of Somerset.

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