Bollywood Cinema: Temples of Desire

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Psychology Press, 2002 - Performing Arts - 296 pages
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India is home to Bollywood - the largest film industry in the world. Movie theaters are said to be the "temples of modern India," with Bombay producing nearly 800 films per year that are viewed by roughly 11 million people per day. In Bollywood Cinema, Vijay Mishra argues that Indian film production and reception is shaped by the desire for national community and a pan-Indian popular culture. Seeking to understand Bollywood according to its own narrative and aesthetic principles and in relation to a global film industry, he views Indian cinema through the dual methodologies of postcolonial studies and film theory. Mishra discusses classics such as Mother India (1957) and Devdas (1935) and recent films including Ram Lakhan (1989) and Khalnayak (1993), linking their form and content to broader issues of national identity, epic tradition, popular culture, history, and the implications of diaspora.
 

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Contents

INVENTING BOMBAY CINEMA
1
MELODRAMATIC STAGING
35
THE TEXTS OF MOTHER INDIA
61
AUTEURSHIP AND THE LURE OF ROMANCE
89
THE ACTOR AS PARALLEL TEXT AMITABH BACHCHAN
125
SEGMENTINGANALYZING TWO FOUNDATIONAL TEXTS
157
AFTER AYODHYA THE SUBLIME OBJECT OF FUNDAMENTALISM
203
BOMBAY CINEMA AND DIASPORIC DESIRE
235
Filmography
271
Bibliography
277
Index
287
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The Myth of Media Globalization
Kai Hafez
No preview available - 2007
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About the author (2002)

Vijay Mishra is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Murdoch University, Perth, Australia. He is author of The Gothic Sublime.

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