The Jungle

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The Floating Press, Jan 1, 2009 - Fiction - 652 pages
42 Reviews
Upton Sinclair's The Jungle is a novel portraying the corruption of the American meat industry in the early part of the twentieth century. The dismal living and working conditions and sense of hopelessness prevalent among the impoverished workers is compared to the corruption of the rich. Upton aimed to make such "wage slavery" issues center-stage in the minds of the American public. Despite already being serialized, it was rejected as a novel five times before being published in 1906, when it quickly became a bestseller.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jimocracy - LibraryThing

I'm going to stick with a solid 3-star rating for this book because overall, I liked it. There were some parts that I really liked and much that I didn't care for. This book really was a rollercoaster ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - datrappert - LibraryThing

I have heard about this book for decades, and knew about its expose of the meatpacking industry. However, I only read it after chancing to come across it while searching for something else on my ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter 1
5
Chapter 2
39
Chapter 3
57
Chapter 4
78
Chapter 5
99
Chapter 6
117
Chapter 7
134
Chapter 8
153
Chapter 18
317
Chapter 19
338
Chapter 20
358
Chapter 21
376
Chapter 22
393
Chapter 23
413
Chapter 24
431
Chapter 25
456

Chapter 9
167
Chapter 10
182
Chapter 11
199
Chapter 12
216
Chapter 13
229
Chapter 14
243
Chapter 15
256
Chapter 16
281
Chapter 17
297
Chapter 26
494
Chapter 27
525
Chapter 28
553
Chapter 29
580
Chapter 30
596
Chapter 31
619
Endnotes
651
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Upton Sinclair, a lifelong vigorous socialist, first became well known with a powerful muckraking novel, The Jungle, in 1906. Refused by five publishers and finally published by Sinclair himself, it became an immediate bestseller, and inspired a government investigation of the Chicago stockyards, which led to much reform. In 1967 he was invited by President Lyndon Johnson to "witness the signing of the Wholesome Meat Act, which will gradually plug loopholes left by the first Federal meat inspection law" (N.Y. Times), a law Sinclair had helped to bring about. Newspapers, colleges, schools, churches, and industries have all been the subject of a Sinclair attack, analyzing and exposing their evils. Sinclair was not really a novelist, but a fearless and indefatigable journalist-crusader. All his early books are propaganda for his social reforms. When regular publishers boycotted his work, he published himself, usually at a financial loss. His 80 or so books have been translated into 47 languages, and his sales abroad, especially in the former Soviet Union, have been enormous.

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