Iowa and the Rebellion: A History of the Troops Furnished by the State of Iowa to the Volunteer Armies of the Union, which Conquered the Great Southern Rebellion of 1861-5

Front Cover
J.B. Lippincott and Company, 1866 - Iowa - 743 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 264 - There was a sound of revelry by night, And Belgium's capital had gathered then Her Beauty and her Chivalry, and bright The lamps shone o'er fair women and brave men; A thousand hearts beat happily; and when Music arose with its voluptuous swell, Soft eyes looked love to eyes which spake again, And all went merry as a marriage bell; But hush!
Page 577 - By direction of the President of the United States, the Departments of the Ohio, of the Cumberland, and of the Tennessee, will constitute the Military Division of the Mississippi.
Page 723 - Then cheer upon cheer for bold Sherman Went up from each valley and glen. And the bugles re-echoed the music That came from the lips of the men. For we knew that the stars in our banner More bright in their splendor would be. And that blessings from Northland would greet us When Sherman marched down to the sea. Then forward, boys, forward to battle, We marched on our wearisome way, And we stormed the wild hills of Resaca — God bless those who fell on that day.
Page 578 - Thus, on the night of the 24th, our force maintained an unbroken line, with open communications from the north end of Lookout Mountain through Chattanooga Valley to the north end of Mission Ridge.
Page 291 - But every break was instantly welded. Our whole line opened fire, but the enemy, seemingly insensible to fear, or infuriated by passion, bent their necks downward and marched steadily to death, with their faces averted like men striving to protect themselves against a driving storm of hail.
Page 522 - I can prove this), and as some of the fire originated in basements stored full of cotton it was impossible to extinguish it. The fire engines were ordered out, but the flames could not be stopped; the buildings were old, nearly all wooden ones, and the...
Page 719 - Your communication demanding surrender of my command I acknowledge receipt of, and respectfully reply that we are prepared for the "needless effusion of blood" whenever it is agreeable to you.
Page 719 - I have placed the forces under my command in such positions that you are surrounded, and to avoid a needless effusion of blood I call on you to surrender your forces at once, and unconditionally.
Page 723 - More bright in their splendor would be, And that blessings from Northland would greet us When Sherman marched down to the sea. Then forward, boys, forward to battle, We marched on our wearisome way, And we stormed the wild hills of Resaca — God bless those who fell on that day. Then Kenesaw, dark in its glory, Frowned down on the flag of the free, But the East and the West bore our standards, And Sherman marched on to the sea.
Page 303 - HOOD: Your communication of this date just received. In reply, I have to state that I am somewhat surprised at the concluding paragraph, to the effect that, if the place is carried by assault, no prisoners will be taken.

Bibliographic information