A Language Silenced: The Suppression of Hebrew Literature and Culture in the Soviet Union

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Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 1982 - History - 320 pages
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Examines the question of the legal status of Hebrew language and culture in the Soviet Union. While the Hebrew tongue was never officially prohibited, the history of the Jewish community within the Soviet and has been a story of conflict, not cooperation.
 

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Contents

The Language Dispute in the PreSoviet Era
11
Legal Aspects Life in a Gray Area
27
Ideological Aspects Unholy Excommunication
47
The Yevsektsia and the Regime Between the Hammer and the Anvil
66
The Pain of Yearning
99
Eight Years of Habimah under the Soviet Regime
124
The Anguish of Dual Loyalty
168
Barren Sheaves and Desert Oases
238
Thawing and Freezing The Later Years
263
By the Rivers of Sorrow
273
Notes
274
Glossary
306
Bibliography
308
Index
313
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Page 12 - Muslims; and then towards the end of the nineteenth century and at the beginning of the twentieth century...
Page 20 - Citizens, Jews! The Jewish people in Russia now face an event which has no parallel in Jewish history for two thousand years. Not only has the Jew as an individual, as a citizen, acquired equality of rights - which has also happened in other countries - but the Jewish nation looks forward to the possibility of securing national rights.

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