Where the Girls Are: Growing Up Female With the Mass Media

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Times Books, 1995 - Social Science - 348 pages
6 Reviews
With more than 60,000 copies sold since its 1995 publication, Susan Douglas's Where the Girls Are provides an insightful and often funny analysis of TV, magazines, commercials, and news in the 60s and 70s, as well as the pop culture images of women pumped into the mass consciousness by the media. From genies to witches, Jackie O to Betty Friedan, the Flying Nun to MTV, Douglas writes of the impact the mass media had on her personal life as well as on the development of the feminist movement.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - KRaySaulis - LibraryThing

Great book with a lot of history wound in with media. My only issue is that there were a few points where it felt she was reaching a little bit... Looking for meaning in areas where there may not have ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - HanGerg - LibraryThing

This book examines the way women have been portrayed in the media roughly since the author's teenage years in the 1950's, up to the time the book was published in 1994. She justifies this approach by ... Read full review

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About the author (1995)

Susan J. Douglas is the Catherine Neafie Kellogg Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Michigan. She is the author of "Listening In: Radio and the American Imagination, Where the Girls Are: Growing Up Female with the Mass Media, " and "Inventing American Broadcasting, 1899-1922." Her journalistic articles have appeared in "The Nation, Ms., In These Times, TV Guide, " and "The Progressive.

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