The Sacred Bridge: Carta's Atlas of the Biblical World

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Carta, 2006 - Religion - 448 pages
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To meet the need for clear and accurate information, Professors Anson F. Rainey and R. Steven Notley have now come forward with an atlas that traces the course of Near Eastern history from the Chalcolithic Age (c. 3500 BCE) to the defeat of Bar Kochba's fighters and their retreat to the caves east of En-gedi. The product of close cooperation between two distinguished scholars of world renown and the knowledgeable and experienced staff of Carta, Jerusalem, this Atlas provides 300 state-of-the-art maps to show as far as possible in terms of modern knowledge the changes and historical processes that affected the lands of the Bible. Included are all historical and biblical episodes that can be depicted cartographically migrations and settlements, battles and conquests, the location and detailed movement of individual historical and biblical characters. In addition, The Sacred Bridge Carta's Atlas of the Biblical World draws on information from all known ancient sources-Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek, Roman and others to reveal trade routes, economic determinants, and the development of international relations. Maps, many of them never before attempted, are presented chronologically, with extensive interpretive texts alongside. Finds, tools, artifacts, inscriptions and other documents from each period also appear in conjunction with the maps. The ultimate usefulness of any complex reference work depends on its index and its bibliography, and The Sacred Bridge Carta's Atlas of the Biblical World provides everything that could be asked for in the way of organized assistance to the reader. Each person or site can be located. An invaluable chronological table correlates historical activity in the East (Mesopotamia and Anatolia), the southern Levant, Egypt, and the Greco-Roman West from 2800 BCE to the second century CE. The superb reference sections contain every article, book or document consulted. The extensive index contains every place name that has been mapped and, in addition, names that still defy exact location but can be shown in relation to specific biblical episodes. New Testament geography, especially that of the Gospels, is interpreted in the light of the new understanding resulting from such discoveries as the Dead Sea Scrolls (e.g., the wider use of Hebrew as a social and religious vehicle than heretofore acknowledged). These refreshing insights serve to define geographical terms used in the New Testament and trace their origin. Documents are presented in their original languages and transcribed or translated into English. A special feature of this atlas is the insertion of these texts and their meaning within the narrative proper."

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Review: The Sacred Bridge: Carta's Atlas Of The Biblical World

User Review  - Goodreads

It is the most detailed atlas I have–The Sacred Bridge by Rainey and Notley. I'll admit it's a luxury but it is the ultimate one available. The maps are small, but the text is detailed to almost every ... Read full review

Contents

Foreword
7
Archaeology
21
World Economy and Society
28
Copyright

48 other sections not shown

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About the author (2006)

R. Steven Notley is professor of Biblical Studies at the New York City campus of Nyack College and former Chairman of the Department of New Testament Studies, American Institute for Holy Land Studies. Anson F. Rainey is emeritus professor of Ancient New Eastern Cultures and Semitic Linguistics at Tel Aviv University, adjunct professor of Historical Geography at Bar Han University and the American Institute of Holy Land Studies.

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