Sanctuaries

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Halden & son, 1887 - Asylum, Right of - 116 pages
 

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Page 110 - Under a due administration of justice this privilege would have been simply and constantly mischievous, as we properly consider it to be in those countries where it still subsists. But in the rapine and tumult of the Middle Ages, the right of sanctuary might as often be a shield to innocence as an immunity to crime. We can hardly regret...
Page 89 - ... in contempt of the protection granted by Her Majesty, contrary to the Law of Nations, and in prejudice of the rights and privileges which Ambassadors and other public Ministers, authorized and received as such, have at all times been thereby possessed of, and ought to be kept sacred and inviolable...
Page 110 - We can hardly regret, in reflecting on the desolating violence which prevailed, that there should have been some green spots in the wilderness, where the feeble and the persecuted could find refuge. How must this right have enhanced the veneration for religious institutions ! How gladly must the victims of internal warfare have turned their eyes from the baronial castle, the dread and scourge of the neighbourhood, to those venerable walls, within which not even the clamour of arms could be heard,...
Page 110 - ... to crime. We can hardly regret, in reflecting on the desolating violence which prevailed, that there should have been some green spots in the wilderness, where the feeble and the persecuted could find refuge.
Page 27 - I will tarry there but one flood and ebb, if I can have passage ; and unless I can have it in such a place, I will go every day into the sea up to my knees, assaying to pass over : and unless I can do this within forty days, I will put myself again into the church as a robber and a felon of our Lord the King, so God me help and his holy judgment.
Page 8 - But if any one do so, then let him be liable in the king's " mund-byrd " and the church-" frith " ; more if he there commit more wrong, if, despite of hunger, he can live ; unless he fight his way out. If the brethren have further need of their church, let them keep him in another house, and let not that have more doors than the church. Let the clmrch" ealdor " take care that during this term no one give him food.
Page 109 - But, notwithstanding all these evasions, people are taken up every day by dozens, like birds in a covey, and especially in London; yet, for all this, they never cease to rob and murder in the streets, (p.
Page 108 - the Clergy are they who have the supreme sway over the country both in peace and war. Amongst other things they have provided that a number of sacred places in the kingdom should serve for the refuge and escape of all delinquents ; and no one, were he a traitor to the crown or had he practised against the King's own person, can be taken out of these by force, and...
Page 29 - Also ye shall be ready at the Obit of King Athelstan at the Dirge and the Mass at such time as it is done, at the warning of the Belman of the town, and do your duty in ringing, and for to offer at the Mass on the morn. So help you God and these holy evangelists.

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