Hunger

Front Cover
Albert Langen, Georg Muller, 1921 - Authors - 263 pages
34 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
12
4 stars
14
3 stars
7
2 stars
1
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - eadieburke - LibraryThing

This book reminded me of Crime and Punishment. It is an easy read but hard to put down. It is a stream of consciousness narrative without much of a plot and an early example of post-modernism. While ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DinadansFriend - LibraryThing

A chilling novel. A stark, uncompromising look at the horrors of literary life in Oslo at the turn to the twentieth century Oslo. To be read by anyone contemplating a life in literary pursuits. It will deter some. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
71
III
129

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 88 - ... joyous frenzy of hunger. I was empty and free from pain, and I gave free rein to my thoughts. In all calmness I revolve things in my mind. With the most singular jerks in my chain of ideas I seek to explain the meaning of my new word. There was no occasion for it to mean either God or the Tivoli;1 and who said that it was to signify cattle show ? I clench my hands fiercely, and repeat once again, " Who said that it was to signify cattle show? " No; on second thoughts, it was not absolutely necessary...
Page 88 - Kuboa". It has letters as a word has. . . . With the most singular jerks in my chain of ideas I seek to explain the meaning of my new word. There was no occasion for it to mean either God or the Tivoli ; and who said that it was to signify cattle show? . . . No, on second thoughts, it was not absolutely necessary that it should mean padlock, or sunrise. ... I had fully formed an opinion as to what it should not signify — No! ... it is impossible to let it signify emigration or tobacco factory (2,...
Page 27 - As I had never seen my shoes before, I set myself to study their looks, their characteristics, and when I stir my foot, their shapes and their worn uppers. I discover that their creases and white seams give them expression — impart a physiognomy to them. Something of my own nature had gone over into these shoes; they affected me, like a ghost of my other I — a breathing portion of my very self.
Page 3 - ... divergence from what they commonly feed on. And they may safely look to Hamsun as a thinker as well as a poet and laughing dreamer, provided they realize from the start that his thinking is suggestive rather than conclusive, and that he never meant it to be anything else. EDWIN BJORKMAN. Xlll Part...
Page 74 - I count my belongings once more — half a penknife, a bunch of keys, but not a farthing. Suddenly I dive into my pocket and take the papers out again. It was a mechanical movement, an unconscious nervous twitch. I selected a white unwritten page, and — God knows where I got the...
Page v - And on this basis the fantastic figures created by Hamsun relate themselves to ordinary humanity as the microscopic enlargement of a cross section to the living tissues. What we see is true in everything but proportion.
Page iii - Instead, he must be classed as an individualistic romanticist and a highly subjective aristocrat, whose foremost passion in life is violent, defiant deviation from everything average and ordinary.
Page 89 - Beg pardon! Your match in idiocy is not to be found; no, sir! Knitting cotton? Ah! go to hell!

Bibliographic information