The Life of Louis Adolphe Thiers

Front Cover
G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1879 - France - 353 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 282 - At Gorhambury on Saturday till Monday. Dined on Friday with Talleyrand, a great dinner to M. Thiers, the French Minister of Commerce, a little man, about as tall as Shiel, and as mean and vulgar-looking, wearing spectacles, and with a squeaking voice. He was editor of the National, an able writer, and one of the principal instigators of the Revolution of July. It is said that he is a man of great ability and a good speaker, more in the familiar English than the bombastical French style. Talleyrand...
Page 345 - It is the duty, therefore, of the immense majority of the people to consult together, to unite and to vote against those who resist the establishment of the only government possible. The Monarchy today, after the three revolutions that have overthrown it, is immediate civil war, if it be established now; and if put off for two years, or three years, the civil war is only postponed until that epoch. The Republic is an equitable participation of all the children of France in the government of their...
Page 186 - We do not believe that respect for the rights of a neighboring people obliges us to permit a foreign power, by placing one of its princes on the throne of Charles V, to disturb to our detriment the present equilibrium in Europe and to place the interests and the honor of France in peril.
Page 29 - Restoration ; and that monarchy overturned, he raised up and served another monarchy; then, he combated this new monarchy, helped to undermine it, and when it fell, declared war against the republic that followed it, until the republic gave way to the empire : then, in fine, after a long series of events, the republic having again appeared, he welcomed it, served it, defended it, and was about to continue to defend it, serve it, and perhaps even again to preside over its destinies, when he was surprised...
Page 345 - ... nevertheless, possible, for it is supported by an immense majority of the people. It is the duty, therefore, of this immense majority of the people to consult together, to unite and to vote against those who resist the establishment of the only government possible. The Monarchy to-day, after the three revolutions that have overthrown it, is immediate civil war, if it be established now ; and if put off for two years, or three years, the civil war is only postponed until that epoch.
Page 343 - France, suggests them so keenly that the nation still shudders at the bare mention of his name? . . . Must France wait until her future masters are ready ; until one candidate is brought over to other ways of thinking, until another has made an advance in his right of succession, and until a third has finished his education? In the meanwhile everything will be in suspense, — commerce, industry...
Page 343 - Now, I ask every honest man, to whatever party he may belong, if the Count de Chambord could be placed on the throne with the opinions that he professes and with the flag that he unfurls, or if it is hoped that he may some day be acceptable after he has modified his views ? We respect him too much to believe it. I will say nothing of the Orleans princes, who wish to be mentioned only after the Count de Chambord, according to their hereditary rank ; but I ask if the country is ready to receive the...
Page 340 - In 1873, when the country saw administrative affairs, the army, and the finances reestablished, and the foreign enemy departed from our soil, a universal cry arose for the abandonment of the provisional form of government, and for the establishment of a permanent government, that is to say, to give to each party, weary of waiting, the government of its choice. But there were three monarchical parties, and but one throne. The idea of gratifying them all had, therefore, to be abandoned. As for myself,...
Page 345 - French policy is liable to be directed by new chiefs and influenced by new ideas? . . . We persistently ask if there be any other alternative than the following: either the Monarchy, which is impossible because there are three claimants and but one throne; or the Republic, difficult to establish without doubt, not because of itself but because of the opposition of the monarchical parties but nevertheless possible, for it is supported by an immense majority of the people. It is the duty, therefore,...

Bibliographic information