Evolution and Social Life

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CUP Archive, 1986 - Social Science - 431 pages
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The concept of evolution is central in anthropology, although the meaning of the term is open to debate. This book examines the ways in which the idea of evolution has been handled in anthropology from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, and by comparing biological, historical, and anthropological approaches to the study of human culture and social life, it lays the foundation for their effective synthesis. Unique in its scope and breadth of theoretical vision, and cutting across the boundaries of natural science and the humanities, it is a major contribution both to the history of anthropological and social thought, and to the contemporary debate on the relationship between human nature, culture, and social life.
 

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Contents

The progress of evolution
1
Mankind ascending
29
The substance of history
74
Times of life
129
Chance necessity and creativity
173
What is a social relationship?
222
Culture and consciousness
293
Notes
377
Bibliography
399
Name index
419
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About the author (1986)

Tim Ingold is Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Aberdeen. His research is wide-ranging and interdisciplinary, spanning environment, technology and social organisation in the circumpolar North, evolutionary theory, human-animal relations, language and tool use, environmental perception and skilled practice. He has received numerous awards and distinctions, including the 2004 Anders Retzius Gold Medal of the Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography.

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