The Mediocracy: French Philosophy Since the Mid-1970s

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Verso, Sep 23, 2002 - Philosophy - 240 pages
Generating great controversy on its publication in France, The Mediocracy argues that a veritable counter-revolution in intellectual life has seen the period of the 'master thinkers' of the 1960s succeeded by an era of generalized mediocrity. Where Althusser or Lacan, Foucault or Derrida once held centre stage, today restorationist currents prevail in academia and on television. Fuelled by a complaisant media, contemporary French ideology seeks neither to interpret nor change the world, but is instead content to legitimise a globally hegemonic neo-liberalism.
 

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Contents

Prologue
3
Baby Boom
6
Sixties Militants
10
La Pensee 68
24
Michel Foucaults Power
33
The Burial of Leftism
46
Gilles Deleuzes Battle
55
The Liberal Transmutation of the French Libertarian
60
Death and Resurrection of the Intellectual
67
Good Evil and Wisdom
76
The Heady Lures of Love
98
Machiavelli in Carpet Slippers
113
Epilogue
133
Bibliography
222
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About the author (2002)

Dominique Lecourt was a pupil of Louis Althusser and Jacques Derrida at the Ecole Normal Superieure in the 1960s. Now Professor of Philosophy at the University of Paris VII, his publications in English include Marxism and Epistemology and Proletarian Science?

Gregory Elliott is a member of the editorial collective of Radical Philosophy and author of Althusser: The Detour of Theory and Labourism and the English Genius: The Strange Decay of Labour England?.

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