The Colonial Bastille: A History of Imprisonment in Vietnam, 1862-1940

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University of California Press, Mar 4, 2001 - History - 370 pages
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Peter Zinoman's original and insightful study focuses on the colonial prison system in French Indochina and its role in fostering modern political consciousness among the Vietnamese. Using prison memoirs, newspaper articles, and extensive archival records, Zinoman presents a wealth of significant new information to document how colonial prisons, rather than quelling political dissent and maintaining order, instead became institutions that promoted nationalism and revolutionary education.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 THE ORIGINS OF THE ILLDISCIPLINED PRISON
13
FRAGMENTED ORDER AND INTEGRATIVE DYNAMICS
38
SURVEILLANCE FORCED LABOR AND TOTAL CARE
72
4 PRISONERS AND PRISON SOCIETY
98
5 COLONIAL PRISONS IN REVOLT 18621930
136
6 THE THAI NGUYEN REBELLION
158
THE INDOCHINESE COMMUNIST PARTY IN PRISON 19301936
200
8 PRISONS AND THE COLONIAL PRESS 19341939
240
9 THE PRISONER RELEASED
267
Epilogue
297
Glossary
303
Select Bibliography
311
Index
331
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Page xviii - Humanities, and the Committee on Research of the University of California, Berkeley, to whom I am immensely grateful.

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About the author (2001)

Peter Zinoman is Associate Professor of Southeast Asian History at the University of California, Berkeley.

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