Historic Sullivan: A History of Sullivan County, Tennessee, with Brief Biographies of the Makers of History

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King printing Company, 1909 - Sullivan County (Tenn.) - 330 pages
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Contents

I
xv
II
ii
III
20
IV
24
V
28
VI
33
VII
39
VIII
45
XIX
137
XX
151
XXI
160
XXII
176
XXIII
203
XXIV
224
XXV
239
XXVI
248

IX
51
X
53
XI
59
XII
64
XIII
68
XIV
73
XV
75
XVI
89
XVII
100
XVIII
109
XXVII
262
XXVIII
272
XXIX
281
XXX
286
XXXI
296
XXXII
312
XXXIII
318
XXXIV
323
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Page 292 - And David sent forth a third part of the people under the hand of Joab, and a third part under the hand of Abishai the son of Zeruiah, Joab's brother, and a third part under the hand of Ittai the Gittite. And the king said unto the people, I will surely go forth with you myself also.
Page 45 - I appeal to any white man to say, if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not meat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not. During the course of the last long and bloody war Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the whites, that my countrymen pointed as they passed, and said, 'Logan is the friend of white men.
Page 203 - Be it resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the thanks of...
Page 45 - Logan, not sparing even my women and children. There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it: I have killed many: I have fully glutted my vengeance: for my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not...
Page 45 - This called on me for revenge. I have sought it : I have killed many : I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country, I rejoice at the beams of peace : but do not harbour a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Page 78 - Indian village, which was inhabited, on the south side of the river: they invited us to 'come ashore,' called us brothers, and showed other signs of friendship, insomuch that Mr. John Caffrey and my son, then on board, took a canoe which I had in tow, and were crossing over to them, the rest of the fleet having landed on the opposite shore. After they had gone some distance, a half-breed, who called himself Archy Coody, with several other Indians, jumped into a canoe, met them, and advised them to...
Page 123 - This sort of talk will be throwing all the blame off me upon the late President, and as he is now out of office, it will be of no consequence how much the Indians blame him.
Page 81 - ... our place of destination. The scene is rendered still more melancholy, as several boats will not attempt to ascend the rapid current. Some intend to descend the Mississippi to Natchez; others are bound for the Illinois — among the rest my son-in-law and daughter. We now part, perhaps to meet no more, for I am determined to pursue my course, happen what will.
Page 203 - William Henry Harrison, and Isaac Shelby, late Governor of Kentucky, and through them to the officers and men under their command, for their...
Page 82 - ... Col. Richard Henderson, who was running the line between Virginia and North Carolina. At this meeting we were much rejoiced. He gave us every information we wished, and, further informed us that he had purchased a quantity of corn in Kentucky, to be shipped at the Falls of Ohio, for the use of the Cumberland settlement. We are now without bread and are compelled to hunt the buffalo to preserve life.

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