Wayland's Work: Anglo-Saxon Art, Myth and Material Culture from the 4th to the 7th Century

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Anglo-Saxon Books, 2010 - Art - 542 pages
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In all the metalwork and archaeological oddments we have from the Anglo-Saxon period, is there anything one could call 'art'? The contributors to this book believe that not only was there considerable artistry in the output of early Anglo-Saxon workshops, but that it was vigorous, complex and technically challenging. The designs found on Anglo-Saxon artifacts is never mere ornament. In a society which used visual and verbal signals to demonstrate power, authority, status and ethnicity, no visual statement was ever empty of meaning. The aim of this work is to prompt a better understanding of Anglo-Saxon art and the society which produced it. Stephen Pollington, Lindsay Kerr and Brett Hammond have assembled in these pages much information and many previously unpublished illustrations which show a wide variety of artifacts, designs and motifs. It is hoped that this will help bring about a wider knowledge and appreciation of Anglo-Saxon art.

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About the author (2010)

Lindsay Kerr is a secondary school teacher and doctoral candidate at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto.

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