Essentialism: A Wittgensteinian Critique

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SUNY Press, 1991 - Philosophy - 237 pages
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After tracing the recent decline in explicitly essentialistic theories, Hallett (Dean of the College of Philosophy and letters, St. Louis U.) critically surveys the essentialism still strongly operative in much philosophical reasoning, then undertakes a fuller inquiry into the sources of essentialism than has previously been attempted. Paper edition (unseen), $16.95. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
 

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Contents

The Decline of Explicit Essentialism
5
The Persistence of Essentialistic Theorizing
29
Calculus and Mosaic
47
NetworkReasoning
69
Other Worlds
95
Sources of Essentialism
125
Diagnoses and Prognosis
147
Notes
183
Works Cited
217
Index
233
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About the author (1991)

Garth L. Hallett, S. J., is Dean of the College of Philosophy and Letters at St. Louis University. He is the author of Wittgenstein's Definition of Meaning as Use; Darkness and Light: The Analysis of Doctrinal Statements; A Companion to Wittgenstein's "Philosophical Investigations;" Christian Moral Reasoning: An Analytic Guide; Logic for the Labyrinth: A Guide to Critical Thinking; Reason and Right; Language and Truth; and Christian Neighbor-Love: An Assessment of Six Rival Versions.

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