John March, Southerner

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1894 - 513 pages
 

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Page 63 - I'd rather you'd not mention it — in school, faw instance — if we can eveh raise money to send you to school. " It's because, in a sense, we a-got so much Ian'. Many's the time I could a-sole pahts of it, an' refused, only because that particulah sale wouldn't a-met the object fo' which the whole tract has always been held. It was yo' dear grandfather's ambition, an' his father's befo' him, to fill these lan's with a great population, p'osp'ous an' happy. We neveh sole an acre, but we neveh hel'...
Page 361 - Our fears, our hopes, our aims are one, Our comforts and our cares. 3 We share our mutual woes, Our mutual burdens bear ; And often for each other flows The sympathizing tear.
Page 217 - All mankind by their fall lost communion with God, are under his wrath and curse, and so made liable to all the miseries of this life, to death itself, and to the pains of hell for ever.
Page 38 - And such the child whose early feet The paths of peace have trod, Whose secret heart with influence sweet Is upward drawn to God. 2 By cool Siloam's shady rill The lily must decay, The rose that blooms beneath the hill Must shortly fade away ; And soon, too soon, the wintry hour Of man's maturer age May shake the soul with sorrow's power, And stormy passion's rage.
Page 483 - Fair, right down there in those streets truth and justice are lying wounded and half-dead, and the public conscience is being drugged! We Southerners, Fair, don't believe one man's as good as another; we think one man in his right place is worth a thousand who can't fill it. My place is here!
Page 51 - The king never dies ; citizenship never ceases ; a bereaved citizenship has no right to put on expensive mourning, and linger through a dressy widowhood before it marries again. . . . There are men who, when their tree has been cut down even with the ground, will try to sit in the shade of the stump. . . . Such men are those who, now that slavery is gone, still cling to a civil order based on the old plantation system. . . . They are like a wood-sawyer robbed of his saw-horse and trying to saw wood...
Page 128 - Dixie was present ; the first one they of the old rigime had actually gotten into the gubernatorial chair since the darkies had begun to vote. Two members of the Governor's staff sat in a front pew in uniform ; blue ! " See that second man on the left ? " whispered Captain Shotwell to an old army friend from Charleston ; " that handsome felleh with the wavy auburn hair, soft mustache, and big, sawt o' pawnderin' eyes ?
Page 292 - Gamble." (Applause.) Gamble said his father used to tell him a man of words and not of deeds was like a garden full of weeds. Here he was silent so long that Champion whispered to Shotwell, " He's stuck ! " But at length he resumed, that he attributed his own success in life to his always having believed in deeds ! " Indeed ! " echoed Shotwell in so audible a whisper that half the group smiled.
Page 235 - And still the old plantation slumbered on below the level of the world's great risen floods of emancipations and enfranchisements whereon party platforms, measures, triumphs, and defeats only floated and eddied, mere drift-logs of a current from which they might be cast up, but could not turn back.
Page 83 - Rock and the Devil's Garden, and all were charmed with the majestic beauty of the scene. On the way back, while Garnet explained to Mr. Gamble, the heavier guest, why negroes had to be <, treated not as individuals but as a class, John had been '"( telling Mr. Fair why it was wise to treat chickens not as a class but as individuals, and had mentioned the names and personal idiosyncrasies of the favorites of his own flock ; Mr.

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