Claude's Book

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H. Holt, 1919 - Spirit writings - 136 pages
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Page 142 - JEAN-CHRISTOPHE DAWN — MORNING — YOUTH — REVOLT JEAN-CHRISTOPHE IN PARIS THE MARKET PLACE — ANTOINETTE — THE HOUSE JEAN-CHRISTOPHE: JOURNEY'S END LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP — THE BURNING BUSH — THE NEW DAWN Some Noteworthy Comments " 'Hats off, gentlemen — a genius.
Page 142 - A noble piece of work, which must, without any doubt whatever, ultimately receive the praise and attention which it so undoubtedly merits. . . There is hardly a single book more illustrative, more informing and more inspiring . . . than M. Romain Holland's creative work, 'John Christopher'.
Page 138 - The first volume of note in this field of history. The author's ' magic of style ' makes his books the most widely circulated of an_y American historian's writings, and their great popularity is based as much on their accuracy and fairness as on their readability.
Page 141 - I make my bread by thy hearth. Good friends, let us be merrie. The time for work is past. Let the tabbie drowse and blink her wisdom to the fire log.
Page 139 - Translated by Jessie Muir. Some Press Notices "The book is world-wide in its significance. It is the chronicle of the growth of labor to consciousness of its rights and its strength to win them." — New York Tribune. "A book for the world ; one can not lay it down without a sense of quickened emotion and enlarged vision." — The Nation. "One of the most momentous books which this century has so far produced." — Manchester Guardian. "Possesses the literary qualities that burst the bonds of national...
Page 141 - Printing. $1.50 net. In July, 1913, Mrs. John H. Curran, of St. Louis, and a friend were amusing themselves with a ouija board, when out of a clear sky came: " Many moons ago, I lived. Again I come. Patience Worth my name." Thus began an intimate association with
Page 126 - ... of his neck, though apparently they did not hit him. He then turned his attention to us, turning left-handed and passing directly below us. This necessitated our getting on to a perpendicular bank and doing a complete circuit to see where he'd go to. The little beggar was describing circuits around us, while we did a sort of inner circle, conducted, of course, with a perpendicular bank; but owing to the fact that our speed was so great and that we were doing complete turns in about twice the...
Page 125 - FE's nose almost vertically; 2000 feet we came down, while the air speed indicator went up to 160 MPH and then stuck, not having been designed for the purpose of exceeding recognised limits. I expected the FE to fold up under the strain any moment, but she stood it like a rock. By this time the other two machines were almost vertically below us — the Hun had caught up the biplane and was 2I4 emptying his gun into it at fifty yards
Page 123 - EXCITING BATTLE IN MID-AIR! An officer in the RFC sent the following letter to the Times:— " Yesterday, being the first fine day, I had instructions to go up in an FE, with ' P' as observer, to take some photographs over . It was about the most unpleasant job going, as the numerous woods about there are absolutely bristling with 'Archies ' of no mean prowess, as I can testify, having had, perforce, to sample some of their wares on many a reconnaisance of late. " It took us roughly an hour to get...
Page 125 - FE out of her nose dive about 200 feet above the Hun, as too sudden a shock would inevitably have crumpled her up. The consequence was that we found ourselves above and behind the unfortunate Teuton, and within twenty yards of him. To my mind he never saw us until we opened fire. Twenty rounds of lead were planted into the back of his neck, though apparently they did not hit him. He then turned his attention to us, turning left-handed and passing directly below us. This necessitated our getting on...

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