Anecdotes and Traditions: Illustrative of Early English History and Literature, Derived from Ms. Sources

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Camden Society, 1839 - Anecdotes - 166 pages
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1839/166p./133

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Page 32 - And the blood shall be to you for a token upon the houses where ye are ¡ and when I see the blood I will pass over you, and the plague shall not be upon you to destroy you when I smite the land of Egypt.
Page xxviii - and said so ; but so had Goldsmith long before him, who tells us in his fifth essay, " that the true use of speech is not so much to express our wants as to conceal them." Lady Hobart was probably Dorothy, wife of Chief Justice Sir Henry Hobart, daughter of Sir Robert Bell, Lord Chief Baron
Page 112 - At bello audacis populi vexatus et armis, Finibus extorris, complexu avulsus liili, Auxilium imploret, videatque indigna suorum Fuñera : nee, cum se sub leges pacis iniquae Tradiderit, regno aut optata luce fruatur ; Sed cadat ante diem, mediâque inhumatus arena.
Page 113 - that the other might have made upon him ; but the place that Falkland stumbled upon was yet more suited to his destiny than the other had been to the King's ¡ being the following expressions of Evander upon the untimely death of his son Pallas, as they are translated by
Page 62 - Talking of stones, stars, plants, of fishes, flies, Playing with words and idle similes. As the English apes, and very zanies be, Of everything that they do hear and see ; So imitating his ridiculous tricks, They speak and write all like mere
Page 32 - And they shall take of the blood, and strike it on the two side posts, and on the upper door post of the houses wherein they
Page iv - salt pits, that you may extract salt out of and sprinkle it where you will. They serve to be interlaced in continued speech : they serve to be recited, upon occasion, of themselves : they serve, if you take out the kernel of them, and make them your
Page xxviii - No, faith, Ben, (sayes he) not I, but I have been considering a great while what should be the fittest gift for me to bestow upon my god-child, and I have resolvM at last."
Page 113 - O Pallas ! thou hast fail'd thy plighted word, To fight with caution, not to tempt the sword ; I warn'd thee, but in vain ; for well I knew, What perils youthful ardour would pursue ; That boiling blood would carry thee too far ; Young as thou were't in dangers, raw to war ! O curst essay of arms, disastrous doom, Prelude of bloody fields and fights to come
Page 13 - thing makes me recollect some story. A gentleman had built a very fine house, and thereby much impaired his fortune. He had a pride, however, in showing it to his acquaintance. One of them, after viewing it all, remarked a motto over the door, ÖIA VANITAS. ' What,' says he,

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