Early Adventures in Persia, Susiana, and Babylonia: Including a Residence Among the Bakhtiyari and Other Wild Tribes Before the Discovery of Nineveh, Volume 2

Front Cover
J. Murray, 1887 - Babylonia
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 304 - And I saw in a vision; and it came to pass, when I saw, that I was at Shushan in the palace, which is in the province of Elam; and I saw in a vision, and I was by the river of Ulai.
Page 400 - sureji," leading a horse, on which was placed my saddle-bags and those of the Tatar, led the way. The Tatar himself followed, with his long whip, which he used incessantly to keep the animals in front of him to their full speed. I brought up the rear. Notwithstanding the darkness of the night, and the state of the tracks which passed for roads, but which were deep in mud and were frequently lost altogether, we galloped day and night as fast as the horses could carry us, over rocky hills and through...
Page 401 - I could thus obtain a few hours' sleep after my journey through the night, I accepted his offer. I was followed by the Tatar, and a " sureji," leading a spare torse for me to mount if necessary. I soon found that this had been a wise precaution. The pasha's carriage was drawn by four small, active horses driven by a Bulgarian coachman, who urged them with his long whip and his cries to their full speed, utterly regardless of the state of the so-called roads and the stones and rocks which encumbered...
Page 403 - I had performed this journey in less time by some hours than Colonel Townley, a Queen's Messenger, whose Tatar ride over the same ground had been mentioned by Lord Palmerston in the House of Commons as the fastest on record. I was, consequently, not a little proud of my feat. As some time had yet to elapse before the Adrianople gate, at which I had arrived, would be opened — the gates of Stamboul were then closed between sunset and sunrise — I dismounted, and lying on the ground, slept...
Page 100 - Arabs who were not armed with guns were cutting down with their swords indiscriminately all whom they met. Bakhtiyari and Arab horsemen dashed into the encampment, yelling their warcries. The horses of the Persians, alarmed by the firing and the shouts, broke from their tethers and galloped wildly about, adding to the general disorder. I kept close to Au Khan Baba, who made his way to the park of artillery, near which, he had learnt, were the tents in which his brothers were confined. I was so near...
Page 403 - ... in less time by some hours than Colonel Townley, a Queen's Messenger, whose Tatar ride over the same ground had been mentioned by Lord Palmerston in the House of Commons as the fastest on record. I was, consequently, not a little proud of my feat. As some time had yet to elapse before the Adrianople gate, at which I had arrived, would be opened — the gates of Stamboul were then closed between sunset and sunrise — I dismounted, and lying on the ground, slept until I could enter the city ....
Page 402 - ... midst of a circle of tailors, seated crosslegged at their work in an open shop. They were not a little alarmed at this sudden intrusion, and I was no less surprised at finding myself in such company — fortunately without hurt or injury. We reached Adrianople early one morning, having galloped day and night without stopping, except to change horses at the post stations. My Tatar, who had been accustomed to travel at a jog-trot pace, which was exceedingly fatiguing to me, declared that he could...
Page 403 - He accordingly conducted me to the " konak," or residence of tho governor, who undertook to provide me at once with a fresh Tatar. Whilst the necessary preparations were being made, I went to a neighbouring Turkish bath. After a short, sound sleep on the soft cushions and white linen of the outer hall, I felt thoroughly refreshed and ready to continue my journey. I dressed and returned to the "konak.
Page 403 - I found everything ready for my departure, and in a few minutes was in the saddle again. The vast undulating plains of Roumelia, smooth as a racecourse, were soon crossed. The bracing October air, with a cloudless sky overhead, and the rapid motion, produced an exhilarating effect which made me forget my fatigues. I reached Constantinople before dawn on the sixth day after leaving Belgrade. I had performed this journey in less time by some hours than Colonel Townley, a Queen's Messenger, whose Tatar...
Page 402 - ... carriage was drawn by four small, active horses driven by a Bulgarian coachman, who urged them with his long whip and his cries to their full speed, utterly regardless of the state of the so-called roads and the stones and rocks which encumbered it. The carriage itself was a rickety, nondescript vehicle, with primitive springs, constructed in Hungary. Sleep was out of the question. I was soon so much shaken that I preferred to dismiss the coachman with a present and complimentary message to his...

Bibliographic information