Development of Class Structure in Eastern Europe: Poland and Her Southern Neighbors

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SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1989 - History - 326 pages
Emphasizing the development of class structure, this book is the first in English to describe the historical and social development of Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Romania from medieval feudalism to modern capitalism. Historically these countries have maintained mostly peaceful relations among themselves in the past and now share the common characteristic of being Soviet "satellites." The author has devoted particular attention to Poland because of its unique political system, as well as its greater size, population, and cultural influence. The book is divided into three sections: part one reviews the early history and social structure of each country; part two provides a sociological analysis of social classes and their evolution over centuries; and part three examines the effect that World War II has had on these social classes.
 

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Contents

A GENERAL VIEW ON THE HISTORY OF EASTERN EUROPE
3
POLAND UNTIL WORLD WAR II
9
CZECHOSLOVAKIA UNTIL WORLD WAR II
29
HUNGARY UNTIL WORLD WAR II
38
ROMANIA UNTIL WORLD WAR II
47
THE PEASANTRY
57
THE NOBILITY AND THE BOURGEOISIE
84
FROM THE PROLETARIAT TO THE WORKING CLASS
109
THE EFFECTS OF WORLD WAR II ON SOCIAL STRUCTURE
167
STRUCTURAL CHANGES INTRODUCED BY THE IMPORTED REVOLUTIONS
194
Maps
203
Abbreviations
215
Notes
217
Bibliography
271
About the Author
309
Name Index
311

THE INTELLIGENTSIA
130

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About the author (1989)

Aleksander Gella is Professor of Sociology at State University of New York, Buffalo.

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