Revolution in Mexico's Heartland: Politics, War, and State Building in Puebla, 1913-1920

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2007 - History - 305 pages
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This carefully researched and richly detailed case study explores the most violent phase of the Mexican Revolution in the key state of Puebla. This book explains the tension between the forces that represented the modernizing centralized state and those who revolted and chose local autonomy. Because of its industry, resources, transportation, and large population during the Revolution, Puebla provides an excellent measuring stick for the rest of the nation during this conflict. This diverse region is perhaps as closely representative as any Mexican state because of its indigenous, mestizo, and criollo peoples, its industrial, commercial, and subsistence workers, its urban and rural populations, and both strong Catholic and zealous anti-clerical groups. David G. LaFrance examines politics, warfare, and state building within the context of autonomy, as well as the military, political, and economic changes that occurred in the name of the Revolution. LaFrance also links events at the state level to those of the nation and localities. Puebla's residents opposed the changes imposed from the outside by the armies of Venustiano Carranza. The concept of autonomy and the degree of resistance of the many groups in Puebla varied, thus leading to limited accommodation with the Carrancistas. LaFrance explains that this compromise provided the means by which the Carrancistas eventually won the wars in Puebla and began the process of creating a new political culture and governing mechanism. Revolution in Mexico's Heartland is an authoritative text on the Revolution in Puebla until 1920. This book is an invaluable source for readers interested in the history of Mexico and the Mexican Revolution.
 

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Contents

IV
1
V
11
VI
31
VII
59
VIII
89
IX
115
X
145
XI
163
XII
187
XIII
201
XIV
209
XV
215
XVI
275
XVII
293
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About the author (2007)

David G. LaFrance is research professor of history at the Benemérita Universidad Autňnoma de Puebla, Mexico.

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