A Glossary of Reference on Subjects Connected with the Far East...

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Crawford & Company, 1878 - 182 pages
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Page 160 - Lures winged insects through the lampless air. SPIRIT My coursers are fed with the lightning, They drink of the whirlwind's stream, And when the red morning is bright'ning They bathe in the fresh sunbeam ; They have strength for their swiftness I deem, Then ascend with me, daughter of Ocean.
Page 43 - Treaties ; and it is hereby expressly stipulated that the British Government and its subjects will be allowed free and equal participation in all privileges, immunities, and advantages that may have been, or may be hereafter, granted by His Majesty the Emperor of China to the Government or subjects of any other nation.
Page 12 - twixt reading and bohea, To muse, and spill her solitary tea, Or o'er cold coffee trifle with the spoon, Count the slow clock, and dine exact at noon...
Page 144 - Here thou, great ANNA ! whom three realms obey, Dost sometimes counsel take — and sometimes tea.
Page ii - In Madras the native domestics speak English of a purity and idiom which rival in eccentricity the famous 'pidgin' English of the treaty ports in China; and the masters mechanically adopt the language of their servants.
Page 6 - (barbarian) shall not be applied to the Government or subjects of Her Britannic Majesty, in any Chinese official document issued by the Chinese authorities, either in the capital or in the provinces.
Page 117 - This pith can be obtained from the stems in beautiful cylinders, from one to two inches in diameter, and several inches in length. The Chinese workmen apply the blade of a sharp, straight knife to these cylinders of pith, and, turning them round dexterously, pare them from the circumference to the centre, making a rolled layer of equal thickness throughout This is unrolled, and weights are placed upon it until it is rendered perfectly smooth and flat Sometimes a number are joined together to increase...
Page 40 - British subjects who may commit any crime in China shall be tried and punished by the Consul or other Public Functionary authorized thereto according to the Laws of Great Britain. Justice shall be equitably and impartially administered on both sides.
Page 155 - The real tortures of a Chinese prison are the filthy dens in which the unfortunate victims are confined, the stench in which they have to draw breath, the fetters and manacles by which they are secured, the absolute insufficiency even of the disgusting rations doled out to them, and above all the mental agony which must ensue in a country with no Habeas corpus to protect the lives and fortunes of its citizens.

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