Dream of the Red Chamber: Hung Lou Meng, Books I and II

Front Cover
The Floating Press, Dec 1, 2009 - Fiction - 2119 pages
Dream of the Red Chamber is one of the four Chinese classics. The novel is semi-autobiographical and it gives an incredibly detailed insight into 18th-century life in China, particularly that of the aristocracy. The plot is grand in scale, peopled with a complex array of characters.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter XXIX
1024
Chapter XXX
1068
Chapter XXXI
1097
Chapter XXXII
1134
Chapter XXXIII
1164
Chapter XXXIV
1190
Chapter XXXV
1227
Chapter XXXVI
1269

Chapter VII
248
Chapter VIII
283
Chapter IX
318
Chapter X
348
Chapter XI
372
Chapter XII
401
Chapter XIII
427
Chapter XIV
456
Chapter XV
486
Chapter XVI
513
Chapter XVII
552
Chapter XVIII
606
Chapter XIX
647
Chapter XX
693
Chapter XXI
719
Chapter XXII
751
Chapter XXIII
791
Chapter XXIV
822
BOOK II
860
Chapter XXV
861
Chapter XXVI
898
Chapter XXVII
935
Chapter XXVIII
969
Chapter XXXVII
1303
Chapter XXXVIII
1355
Chapter XXXIX
1395
Chapter XL
1429
Chapter XLI
1481
Chapter XLII
1515
Chapter XLIII
1552
Chapter XLIV
1589
Chapter XLV
1624
Chapter XLVI
1662
Chapter XLVII
1703
Chapter XLVIII
1741
Chapter XLIX
1777
Chapter L
1815
Chapter LI
1864
Chapter LII
1901
Chapter LIII
1945
Chapter LIV
1988
Chapter LV
2033
Chapter LVI
2074
Note
2118
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Born into a wealthy clan of bondservants to the Manchu imperial family that for three generations had controlled China's textile monopoly in Nanking, Cao Xue Qin (also known as Ts'ao Chang) spent his childhood and adolescence in a large extended family surrounded by opulence. When Cao was 13, in 1728, the Yung-cheng emperor, suspicious of the Cao family's possible ties to rival claimants of the throne and dissatisfied with their performance in Nanking, confiscated the family property. The family was forced to move to Peking and spend the rest of their lives in greatly reduced circumstances. In his lonely middle years, Cao comforted himself by composing the brilliant long novel known as The Dream of the Red Chamber (1792) and also as The Story of the Stone. The work is both a nostalgic recreation of the golden world of his childhood, and a Buddhist and Taoist warning that worldly achievements and material possessions are vain and unenduring. The last 40 chapters of the 120-chapter novel were written or edited by a second author, Kao O [Gao E]. That Manchu nobleman more or less followed Cao's original intentions, probably worked from rough drafts of Cao's. However, there is some evidence that Cao originally intended the work to end even more starkly and tragically than it does. Political prudence, however, made it necessary for Kao O to tone down what might have been perceived as criticism of the family's harsh treatment by the emperor.

Bibliographic information