The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England: To which is Added an Historical View of the Affairs of Ireland, Volume 8

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Clarendon Press, 1826 - Great Britain
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Page 239 - That seeing they may see, and not perceive; and hearing they may hear, and not understand; lest at any time they should be converted, and their sins should be forgiven them.
Page 171 - ... he heard that sir Charles Coote, who was provost marshal general, had taken him out of prison, and caused him to be put to death in the morning, before, or as soon as it was light; of which barbarity...
Page 3 - For my people have committed two evils ; they have forsaken me, the fountain of living waters, and hewed them out cisterns, broken cisterns, that can hold no water. Is Israel a servant ? is he a home-born slave ? why is he spoiled ? The young lions roared upon him, and yelled, and they made his land waste: his cities are burned without inhabitants.
Page 37 - Signed, David Ossoriensis" This extravagant proceeding did not yet terrify those of the confederate catholics, who understood how necessary the observation of the peace was for the preservation of the nation...
Page 105 - ... except some few, who, during the time of the assault, escaped at the other side of the town ; and others, who, by mingling with the rebels as their own men, so disguised themselves that they were not discovered ; there was not an officer, soldier, or religious person belonging to that garrison left alive ; and all this within the space of nine days after the enemy appeared before the walls...
Page 183 - ... should be suffered to put garrisons according to the articles of the peace, in all places as he should judge necessary for the defence of the kingdom; wishing at last that some course might be taken for his support, in some proportion answerable to his place, yet with regard to the...
Page 9 - ... them ; and though there were some laws against them still in force, which necessity, and the wisdom of former ages, had caused to be enacted, to suppress those acts of treason and rebellion which...
Page 36 - And whereas notwithstanding our declaration, yea, the declaration of the whole clergy of the kingdom, to the contrary, the Supreme Council and the Commissioners have actually proceeded to the publication, yea, and forcing it upon the city by terror and threats, rather than by any free consent or desire of the people. We having duly...
Page 92 - Catholic religion, and even with any humanity to the Irish nation, and more especially to those of the old native extraction, the whole race whereof they had upon the matter sworn to EXTIRPATE,
Page 170 - When his lordship came to Dublin, he informed the lords justices of the prisoner he had brought with him, and of the good testimony he had received of his peaceable carriage, and of the pains he had taken to restrain those with whom he had credit, from entering into rebellion, and of many charitable offices he had performed : of...

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