Missionary Conquest: The Gospel and Native American Cultural Genocide

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Fortress Press, Jan 1, 1993 - Religion - 182 pages
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This fascinating probe into U.S. mission history spotlights four cases: Junipero Serra, the Franciscan whose mission to California natives has made him a candidate for sainthood; John Eliot, the renowned Puritan missionary to Massachusetts Indians; Pierre-Jean De Smet, the Jesuit missioner to the Indians of the Midwest; and Henry Benjamin Whipple, who engineered the U.S. government's theft of the Black Hills from the Sioux.
 

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The book by George E. Tinker is a fascinating collection of missionary experiences in America and surrounding territories. It has been carefully articulated looking at the pros and cons of doing mission in a terrain that has multiplicity of cultural backgrounds and various motives behind the acceptance of the message. It is a piece that unpacks the undesirable outcomes when culture and Gospel try to encounter each other. This is a historical masterpiece worthy to read. 

Contents

Missionary Intentions Missionary Violence
1
John Eliot Conversion Colonialism and the Oppression of Language
21
Junípero Serra Spiritual Conquest and Famine in California
42
PierreJean De Smet Manifest Destiny and Economic Exploitation
69
Henry Benjamin Whipple The Politics of Indian Assimilation
95
The Enduring Dilemma Where Do We Go from Here?
112
Notes
125
Selected Bibliography
167
Index
175
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