Yugoslavia: Oblique Insights and Observations

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University of Pittsburgh Pre, 2008 - History - 384 pages
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Defying Stalin and his brand of communism, Tito's Yugoslavia developed a unique kind of socialism that combined one-party rule with an economic system of workers' self-management that aroused intense interest throughout the Cold War. As a member of the American Universities Field Staff, Dennison Rusinow became a long-time resident and frequent visitor to Yugoslavia. This volume presents the most significant of his refreshingly immediate and well-informed reports on life in Yugoslavia and the country's major political developments.

 Rusinow's essays explore such diverse topics as the first American-style supermarket and its challenge to traditional outdoor markets; the lessons of a Serbian holiday feast (Slava); the resignation of vice president Rankovic; the Croatian Spring of 1971; ethnic divides and the rise of nationalism throughout the country; the tension between conservative and liberal forces in Yugoslav politics; and the student revolt at Belgrade University in 1968. Rusinow's final report in 1991 examines the serious challenges to the nation's future even as it collapsed.
 

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Contents

Chapter1
3
Chapter2
11
Chapter3
26
Chapter4
42
Chapter5
49
Chapter6
62
Chapter7
105
Chapter8
137
Chapter11
237
Chapter12
247
Chapter13
293
Chapter14
315
Notes
341
Index
363
Spine
371
BackCover
372

Chapter9
163
Chapter10
199

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About the author (2008)

Dennison Rusinow was a research professor at the University Center for International Studies and emeritus professor of history at the University of Pittsburgh. He was the author of five books, including The Yugoslav Experiment, 1948-1974.

Gale Stokes is Mary Gibbs Jones Professor of History, Emeritus, at Rice University. His books include: Three Eras of Political Change in Eastern Europe; The Walls Came Tumbling Down: The Collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe; and From Stalinism to Pluralism: A Documentary History of Eastern Europe since 1945.

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